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Full text of "KPFK folio"

Pf.EASE POST 

For information call 478-1041 




ANNA KAflf NINA 



PHYLLIS DE PICCIOTTO in association with LAEMMLE THEATRES presents 



A Festival cf Films 



1 OCT. 3-4 
OCT. 10-11 



ROYAL 11A.M. 
ESQUIRE iiA.M. 

ANNA KAREN INA la. pimmum 

"Sya PI isetskaya in the ballet-film 
based on Tolstoy's novel. Also with: 
Alexander Godunov , Vladimir Tikhooov, 
Nina Sorokina, Valery Levintal, Lev 
;tatl3nd. 81 min, USSR, 1974 

PAS DE PeUX 14 min. Canada, 1968 

Dancers: Margaret Mercier S Vincent Warren. 
Award-winning short by Norman McLaren 
7 OCT. 10-11 '"^mtfl t llJlJ. l t I I 
OCT. 17-18 ESQUIRE 11A.M.. 

ROMEO AND JULIET i.a prfmure 

"May be the most remarkable screen 
dance creation ever of fered. . . lavishl" 

N.Y. Times 
AND PRIZE WINNER CANNES FESTIVAL 1955 
Corps de Ba! let and orchestra of the 
80LSH0I Theatre Moscow. Juliet danced 
: . GAL INA ULANOVA and Romeo hv YURI 
'\*V- 95 min, USSR, 1954 

3 OCT. 17-18 ROYAL ifA.Kf. 
OCT. 24-25 ESQUIRE 11A.M. 

PLISETSKAYA DANCES 70 min, 1964 

MAYA PLISETSKAYA of the Bolshoi Ballet 
dances in scenes from: SWAN LAKE, SLEEPING 
BEAUTY, LAURENCIA, SPARTACUS, THE LITTLE 
HUMPBACKED HORSE, KHOVANSCHINA and others. 

ADOLESCENCE 22 min, France, 1966 

li.e magnificent MADAME EGOROVA(no«i over 80) 

Jances again to demonstrate to her pupil 

SON I A PETROVNA. 

4 OCT. 24-25 ROYAL IIA.M. 
0CT.31-N0V.1 ESQUIRE HA.M. 

SPARTACUS iji f«iMii«i 

"■'uri Grigorovich's SPARTACU' ■• • :; 

!wn as both ballet and film. ..One of 
Dest dance films ever made. 

N.Y. Times 
Dancers of the BOLSHOI BALLET, featuring 
v'ladimir Vassiliev, Natalia Bessmertnova, 
Maris Liepa and Nina Timofeyeva. 
The music is by Aram Khachaturtan . 

95 min, ■^:.\r.. 1077 

5 0CT.31-N0V.1 ROYAL ha M 
NOV.- 7-8 ESQUIRE 11A.M. 

SLEEPING BEAUTY 92 min, , ■ ■: 



The KIROV BALLET rendering of the Petipa 
classic. Director: KONSTANTIN SERGEYEV. 
'jancers: ALLA SIZOVA, YURI SOLOVYOV, 
NATALIA MAKAROVA and VALERY PANOV. 

YOUNG MAN AND DEATH 15 min, France, 1965 
i-TJDOLF NUREYEV and "ZIZI" JEANMAIRE dance 
*o OACH'S PASSACAGLIA AND FUGUE IN C MINOR. 
I -(oqrapher: ROLAND PETIT. 



NOV. 7-8 
N",'V. 14-15 



ROYAL 11A.M. 
ESQUIRE llA.M. 



-:i"i.-L HUnPBA:KED horse ■■'- rir,, :■__,,.,, ; ,,M 
A magical tour through the land of flying 
horses, dancing fish and tumbling clowns. 
The BOLSHOI BALLET features MAYA' PL 1 5ET- 
5KAYA and VLADIMIR VASILIEV. 

GAITE PARISIEN NE 

LEONIUE MASSINE and the BALLET RUSSE DE 
MONTE CARLO. Rare footage of the heirs of 
Diaghiliev's company. 20 min, 1941 

yWr."**-!? ROYAL 11A.M. 

NOV. 21-22 ESQUIRE 11A.M. 

SJARS OF THE RUSSIATJ BALLET ia niMiin 
Featuring the BOLSHOI BALLET ana LENINGRAD 
OPERA. SWAN LAKE with Galina Ulanova; 
THE FOUNTAIN OF BAKHCHISARAI , Ulanova and 
Maya Plisetskaya; THE FLAMES OF PARIS, a 
colorful homage to the French Revolution. 

80 min, USSR, 1953 
GALINA ULANOVA 

Excerpts from: GISELLE, DYING SWAN, ROMEO 

AND JULIET and LES SYLPHIOES. -^7 min, '96^ 

8 NOV. 21 -22 ROYAL HA M 

NOV. 28-29 ESQUIRE IIA.H. 

SWAN LAKE 



Leningrad's KIROV BALLET in TSCHAIKOVSKY 

classic. Dancers: Yalena Yevteyeva, John 

Markovsky, Makhmud Esambayev, Valer" Panov. 

Directors: Konstantin Sergeyev and 

Apol I inari Dudke. 

Choreography: Sergeyev( based on Petipa- 

Ivanov original ) 

90 min, Russian, 1969 

9 NOV. 28-29 ROYAL 11A.M. 

DEC. S-6 ESQUIRE HA.M. 

CHILDREN OF THEATRE STREET 

The inside story of the KIROV SCHOOL (for- 
merly the Imperial Ballet School of Russia), 
the school that p reduced :Nijinsky, Pavlova, 
Ulanova, Nureyev, Makarova, Baryshnikov . 
This is the exciting adventure of those who 
follow in their footsteps. A poignant and 
joyous film, narrated by Princess Grace o* 
t^naco. 90 min, 1978 



10 DEC. S-6 

DON QUIXOTE 



ROYAL onlj' 11:00 A.M. 



85 min. Austral i a, 1976 
"This is a comic ballet, full of sunlight 
and Nureyev is the sun king. "-L. A. Times 
Directed by RUDOLF NUREYEV 4 ROBERT HELPMANN 
Dancers: NEREYEV, HELPMANN, LUCETTE ALDOUS, 
RAY POWELL, FRANCES CR0E5E, COLIN PEASLEY. 



IN A REHEARSAL ROOM 



Stars CYNTHIA GREGORY K 
to PACHELBEL'S CANON IN D. 
by AMERICAN BALLET THEATRES 

cdance association 



I I min, 1975 
IVAN NAGY, dancing 
Choreography Is 
Wi 1 1 lam Carter. 



Sat.aSun. 
11:00 A.M. only 

all programs 

^ />Be SuajtCT TO CMAUGt 



, LAEM MLE T HEATRES 

IROYAL THEATREl ^ lESOUIRE THEATREI 

llSii Santa Monica Blvd. ^ 2670 E. ColOTado Blvd. 

West Los AnRCles V> 



Pasadena 



$4.00 ADMISSION 



DISCOUNT TICKET 
5 admissions $15.00 




.BALLET FILM FESTIVAU 
Ticket order form 



NO RESERVED SEATS 
ALL PROCRAMS SUB.IECT TO rilANCE 



' tickets by mai I : 
.'ck payable to LAEMMLE THEATRES. 
•h ticket order fonn to: 
LAEIWLE THEATRES 
' I ''1 Santa Monica Blvd. 
"nqelos CA 90025 
E A SELE-AODRESSEO, 
f.MLOPl. 



PROGRAM 



THEATRE 



DATE 



HOW MANY 



AOORESS 



THE FOUNMIH OF BAKHCHISARAI 
STARS OF THE RUSSIAN BALLET 



■<TNf 



SEND DISCOUNT TICKETS (5 adm. ) at SIS. 00 EACH. 

TOTAL ENCLOSED J 

(Tlekttt also available at boxofflce on the dole 



Folio 



KPFK 90.7-fin 



KPFK STAFF 

General Manager: Jim Berland. Program Director; Clare 
Spark. Interim Development Dir: Jeannie Pool. Music: 
John Wager-Schneider (on leave). News and Public Af- 
fairs: Marc Cooper, Di'.; Diana Martinez, Asst. Dir.; Tony 
Cavin (int.). Cultural Affairs; Paul Vangelisti, Dir. Exec. 
Prod., Traffic; Roy Tucl<man. Production; Raffaello 
Mazza, Dir.; Margaret Fowler, Mgr.; Fernando Velazquez, 
N'!ws Eng.; Sylvester Rivers. Chief Engineer: Don Wilson. 
Maint. Eng; Bob Reite; John Glass, asst. (int.). Circula- 
tion; Ahna Armour, Dir Public Relations/Community 
Events; Mario Casetta, Dir. (on leave). Friends Coord,: 
Suzi Weissman (int.); Promotion Asst.; Kathy Harada. Re- 
ception/Info Coord; Bob Aldrich. Folio: Audrey Tawa, 
Editor. _ 

KPFK LOCAL ADVISORY BOARD 
Danny Bakewell, Ruth Galanter, Brownlee Haydon, 
Linda Hunt, Wilma Keller. Diana Martinez, Mel 
Reich, Anita Steinberg, Laurence Steinberg, Roy 
Tuckman, Delfino Varela, David Wesley. 



The KPFK Local Advisory Board meets on the 
third Tuesday of each month, 7:30 p.m., at the 
station. Observers are invited to attend. 



KPFK Switchboard: 213/877-2711,984-2711, 
980-5735. Open Mon.-Fri., 9;30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 



PACIFICA FOUNDATION: 5316 Venice Blvd., 
Los Angeles 90019. 213/ 931-1625. 



Pacifica Foundation National Board of Directors & Offi- 
cers; Hon. Chair: R. Gordon Agnew; Chair: Jack O'Dell; 
Pres.; Peter Franck; 1st VP: David Lampel; VPs: Ray 
Hill, Rosemarte Reed, Sharon Maeda, Jim Berland, Da- 
vid Salniker; Treas; Milton Zisman; Asst. Treas: Dan 
Scharlin;Sec: Ytng Lee Kelley; Asst. Sec: Ron Clark; 
Exec. Committee: Ying Lee Kelley, Delfino Varela, Da- 
vid Lampel, Marie Nahikian. National Board of Directors 
(not named above): Richard Asche, Gabrielle Edgcomb, 
Margaret Giaser, Philip Maldari, Robbie Osman, Sandra 
Rattley, Julius Mel Reich, Alex Vavoulis. 
Pacifica Foundation National Office; Sharon r.'dedo. 
Executive Drrector; Norman Erazo, Controller; Ron 
Pelletier. Admin. Assistant, Mariana Berkovich. Book 
keeper Pacifica Program Service & Tape Library: Hel 
en Kennedy, Director; Sandra Rosas. Business Mgr ; 
Catherine Suffer. Engineer. Pacifica National News 
Service & Washington News Bureau: 868 National 
Press BIdq , Washington DC 20045 202 628 4620, 
PACIFICA NETWORK SISTER STATIONS: 
KPFA: 2207 Shattuck Ave Berkeley CA 94704. 
KPFT; 419 Lovett Blvd Houston TX 77006- 
WBAI; 505 Eighth Ave. New York NY 10018. 
WPFW; 700 H St., NW, Washington D.C. 20001. 



VOLUME 23 NUMBER 10 



OCTOBER 1981 



THE FOLIO (1SSN0274-4856) is the monthly pu- 
blication of KPFK, 90.7 FM, with offices and stu- 
dios at 3729 Cahuenga Blvd. West, North Hollywood 
CA 91604. Second Class Postage paid at Studio City 
CA and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: 
send address changes to P.O. Box 8639, Universal Ci- 
ty CA 91608. The Folio is not sold, it is sent free to 
each subscriber supporting non-profit, non-commer- 
cial KPFK, and contains the most accurate possible 
listings of the programs broadcast. Subscriptions to 
KPFK are S30 per year, and are transferrable to the 
other Pacifica stations. Our Transmitter is on Mt. 
Wilson. We broadcast in stereo multiplex with 25 
microsecond pre-emphasis. Dolby calibration tones 
air daily before the principal evening music program. 
KPFK is owned and operated by the Pacifica Foun- 
dation, a non-profit institution. KPFK is a member 
of the Association of California Public Radio Sta- 
tions and the National Federation of Community 
Broadcasters. 



A note from Jim Berland: 

For those of you who have been watching this space and the Report to the 
Listener, you have noted a number of departures during the past three 
months. Here we add some others. In all cases those who have left have 
shared their commitment for a time with you listeners; in all cases, they con- 
tinue that commitment, and as with Carl Stone, urge your continued support 
of KPFK and Pacifica that is certainly needed now. 

conlintied on page 35. 



At the Mike 



October marks the advent of 
change in the Music Department 
here at KPFK. Lois Vierk, John 
Wager-Schneider, and I are de- 
parting from the station as staf- 
fers and moving on to other things: 
Lois will be continuing her work 
as a composer and as a student of 
Japanese classical music, with hopes 
to visit Japan in the Spring of '82; 
John will be teaching in the Los 
Angeles area and continuing his 
development as an outstanding in- 
terpreter of 20th century music 
for the guitar. For myself, I plan 
to be doing many things: some mu- 
sic criticism, special radio projects, 
and giving more attention to my 
work as a composer. 

All of us will be doing program- 
ming at the station for as long as 
it wants us; Lois with Morning of 
the World, John with Soundboard, 
and myself with Imaginary Land- 
scape. 

To be completely honest and candid, I have to say that I leave 
KPFK with sadness and regret because of differences here. Yet I 
want to impress upon you if I can the importance now more than 
ever of listener support for this station. KPFK-Pacifica as an institu- 
tion is a vital counter to Reagan and his Reaganomics, and all that 
those things mean. It has the means, supplied by its charter, to pro- 
vide vital information in times of crisis and to serve as an antidote 
to cutbacks in the arts. I urge your full support in this month's 
fund drive to sustain this great ideal. I also urge you to take advan 
tage of this opportunity to make your opinions about music pro- 
gramming known to mangement here. Your feedback is vital. 
My best. 





OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 3 








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FOLIO PAGE 5 



Fall Fund 
Drive 



Men & Women 
Against Sexism 



As you know, KPFK depends almost 
entirely on Its listening audience for 
monetary support. Part I of our Fall 
Fund Drive is upon us, and we con- 
tinue our efforts to declare our in- 
dependence from government funding. 
We can do that only with your help. 
From October 3 through 17 we'll 
Intersperce our programming with 
appeals to new subscribers, and ask 
for your continued assistance. The 
proof of the pudding is in our pro- 
gramming: an entire day devoted to 
the issue of sexism; a teach-in on 
Reaganomics; special documentaries 
on El Salvador. Provocative alterna- 
tive programming is a Pacifica tra- 
dition. Help us preserve it. 




Friends, Lovers, and Family: Battling Sexism-Saturday, October 3. 

To kick off the Fall Fund Drive with an examination of some issues 
that affect us all every day of our lives, Jeannie Pool of KPFK and 
Don Cannon of the Los Angeles Men's Collective have put together 
this special day of programming. This unique look at the fight by 
women, men, and children to end sexism includes music, poetry, 
panel discussions, and listener phone calls. 

What constitutes honesty in releationships? What questions should be 
asked when one considers having children? What is the Feminist Men's 
Movement and how does it work to actively support women's libera- 
tion activities? Are women and men beginning to better communicate 
with one another in the 1980s because of a decade of feminism in 
America? How widespread is domestic violence and can it be stopped? 
What most influences our concepts of the ideal mate? Is friendship 
and love between women and men possible? 

These and other questions will be posed, and answers probed, with 
discussions on non-sexist day care, m_en with children, friendship, bat- 
tered women, reproductive rights, the ERA, love and friendship be- 
tween men and women. The most provocative program of the day will 
be "The New Right's Plot to Destroy the Family" moderated by Dave 
Dismore, which includes a presentation on the history of the family, 
an analysis of the proposed Family Protection Act, an examination of 
the anti-feminist backlash, and the prospects for healthy families. 
The evening concert live from Studio Z features Folkways recording 
artist Willie Sordill from Boston, known for his political non-sexist 
songs; poet David Steinberg from Santa Cruz; Womansong with Julie 
North and Kass Krain; Bev and Jerry Praver; and hosted by John 
Paul of the Provisional Theatre and L.A. Men's Collective, and Jeannie 
Pool. If you are interested in attending , make your reservation by 
calling KPFK at 213-877-2711 during business hours. 

mm 



OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 6 



Reaganomics 
Teach-in 



In Celebration 
of Bl^ck Music 



Live from Studio Z, a teach-in on 
Reaganomics, the Corporate State, 
and the Future of Democracy on 
Wednesday, October 7, 8:00 pm. 
Topics for discussion by our panel 
of expert analysts will include the 
transfer of funding away from social 
programs and toward the military; 
Reagan foreign policy and its effect 
on domestic policy; civil liberties and 
the consciousness of the middle and 
working classes. The teach-in will be 
broadcast live, and is also open for 
your participation. You'll be able to 
question directly our panel. Make 
seating reservations by calling the 
station during business hours: the 
number is 213-877 2711. KPFK is 
located at 3729 Cahuenga Boulevard 
West in North Hollywood, just off 
the Lankershim exit of the Hollywood 
Freeway. 




The realm of Black music is multi-faceted— from Coltrane's "A 
Love Supreme" to Scott Joplin's "Opera Treemonisha." On Sunday, 
October 18 from 9:00 am to midnight, we'll take a walk down 
musical memory lane, into the present, and then take a step into 
the future of Black music. 

Sylvester Rivers and percussionist Gary Alexander will examine 
African, reggae, calypso, political, and revolutionary music, while 
ethnomusicologist Dr. Lance Williams will present blues, bebop, 
swing, and Big Band music. 

We will rebroadcast concerts recorded live in KPFK's Studio Z, 
as well as produce a live concert on this day for your listening 
enjoyment. Join us in the festivities! Keep listening to the air for 
more information about performers as things develop. 
Programming will include interviews with Peter Tosh, Bumps 
Blackwell, Horace Tapscott, Gerald Wilson, drummer Al Williams, 
and other L.A. musicians. And local musicians will participate in 
a live panel discussion of the music business and its political 
aspects. 

As our day progresses, we'll present a jazz program probably un- 
like any you've heard in quite some time. Aman Kifahamu (of 
KUSC fame) and Pearl Shelby have quite a few surprises in store 
for you. And, last but not least, we cannot even begin to think 
about Black music without dealing with Rock & Roll, Rhythm 
& Blues, funk and Top 40. 

Join us Sunday, October 18— be a part of our "Celebration of 
Black Music." 




OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 7 



Film Club Special "Classic" Screening. 
The Sandglass, written and directed 
by Wojciech J. Has, in Polish with 
English subtitles; 124 nninutes, color. 
The Sandglass had its American pre- 
miere at 1975 Filmex, and has not 
received commercial exhibition in 
Los Angeles. 

The following description comes from 
the Filmex screening notes; 
Wojciech Has, a leading artist in a 
country replete with creative talent, 
has woven together a collection of 
short stories by Bruno Schuiz, one 
of Poland's leading literary figures 
of the inter-war years, to create a 
baroque movie which enters and re- 
veals the Schuiz world of complexes 
and psychological obsessions. There 
is no plot in the conventional sense. 
The film is a poetic relation of dreams 
ruled by ambiguity and free associa- 
tion. Joseph, the protagonist, arrives 
at a sanatorium to visit his father. 
On his arrival he steps through an 
allegorical gate, a gate to the world 
of fantasy called up from the sub- 
conscious. Time has not only slowed 
to a halt, but begun to go backwards, 
allowing Joseph to reconstruct many 
things from the past. Events, happen 
ings occur as in a kaleidoscope. He 
finds himself among the people who 
were the closest to him; his father, 
his mother, the servant Adele, his 
friends Rudolph and Bianca, an im- 
poverished trader, the assistants at 
the mercer's shop owned by Joseph's 
father, and the "Holy Originals," em- 
blematic figures which pass through 
the film like phantoms (pirates, red 
Indians, trappers, soldiers, cowboys 
and sailors). The Sandglass is a film 
about relationships dissolving, as the 
world of childhood reality slowly 
recedes into an irretrievable past. 
It may also be viewed as an artist's 
rendering of the theoretical formu- 
lations of psychoanalysis. 

KPFK's screening will take place 
Saturday, October 17 at 10:30 am 
at the Fox Venice Theatre. 

Reservations will be taken between 
6-8 pm on Thursday, the 15th. 
Please present your Film Club card 
at the door. 



The Dolby Quandary: 
You may have noticed that a lot of 
films these days boast in their adver- 
tising of their Dolby sound. This 
expensive Dolby process is used par- 
ticularly in films which emphasize 
their music, or make especially in- 
tricate use of sound. Because of the 
cost of Dolby playback equipment, 
it's usually found only in first-run 
theaters specializing in big-budget, 
mass-audience films. (Neighborhood 
exhibition of the same films won't 
be in Dolby, but the distributors 
want preview audiences to see their 
movies "at their best.") 

Since the theaters which are avail- 
able for Film Club use on a no-fee 
basis generally show foreign or "art" 
films, they don't have or need Dolby 
playback. But lately, some films of 
considerable merit have come along 
which we know you'd enjoy seeing, 
and which require a Dolby theater. 
A case in point is September's splen- 
did offering, "Chariots of Fire." It 
required payment for theater rental, 
and KPFK simply didn't have the 
bucks. We were able to show it only 
because of the generosity of Warner 
Bros, and the Ladd Company, who 
donated the rental money, as well 
as the film. 



It would have been agonlzmg to 
have had to pass up such an excep- 
tional film for want of a few hun- 
dred dollars, and we know we'll 
face this problem again. We're work- 
ing on a variety of possible solutions 
but in the meantime, here's what 
we'll do: 

•**lf a film comes along which we 
can screen only in a Dolby theater, 
and it's unquestionably superior to 
alternative films available to us, 
rather than denying you the oppor- 
tunity of having a Film Club screen- 
ing of it, we'll institute a small sur- 
charge at the door. The sum should 
never have to exceed 50 cents per 
person. 

The theater(s) will be chosen to max- 
imize seats, and minimize parking 
problems, but since Dolby theaters 
generally are located in areas of com- 
mercial density, we have to be real- 
istic about this. 

IVIeanwhile, we're extremely pleased 
with the films we've been able to 
show you this past year, and our 
efforts to obtain stimulating fare 
will continue unabated. 

Barbara Spark 




OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 8 






Report 
to the 
Listener 



This month marks the opening of our 
Fail Fund Drive. . .Independence II. 

At press time our goal had not been 
established, but the process for estab- 
lishing it is clear, and you will hear 
much about it during the drive itself. 

Like the last spring drive, this one 
will be in two parts. The first two 
weeks in October (3-17), and the con- 
clusion with two weeks during the 
month of November. 

Here we present our current opera- 
ting expenses. This will be the basis 
for our operation until January 1, 
1981. 

In next month's Folio and on the 
air we will present our budget for 
growth, which we hope to implement 
on January 1 , For many years we 
have not felt that we could budget on 
the basis of growth to actually meet 
the needs of the community, but 
only budget to survive on the lowest 
level. The times demand more of all 
of us. Staff cannot survive and work 
productively if we do not address in- 
flation, and increase salaries. Equip- 
ment will not continue to survive if 
it is not properly maintained and re- 
placed when it is worn out. The sta- 
tion will not grow to meet expanding 
needs if we do not reach out to new 
audiences, and that will not be done 
unless we devote some resources to 
that. 

What is presented here, we hope to 
be a budget of the past. Next month 
you will see a budget of the future 
and a description of the positive con- 
sequences for broadcasting on KPFK. 

Our Fall Drive Goal will reflect an 
attempt to reach for that new level 
of activities. 




Jim Berland 
General Manager 



NON-PEOPLE EXPENSES 



Administrative: 




Telephone 


32,400 


Postage 


14,500 


Associations 


1,500 


Periodicals 


300 


Interest on Loans 


1,875 


Bank Charges 




(Subscription System) 


15,000 


Travel & Board Expenses 


6,000 


Rent (Transmitter) 


590 


Mortgage Payments 


7,200 


Property Taxes 


120 


Equipment Rental 


4,000 


Utilities 


28,800 


Maintenance (non-technical) 


2,400 


Other Admin. Expenses 


1,500 



Total Non-People 
Expenses 



116,185 



Programming: 




News Services 


9,600 


Maintenance (technical) 


1 1 ,000 


Pre-recorded Materials 


6,400 


Tape and Supplies 


8,000 


Other Programming Exp. 


2.000 



39,500 



Development: 




Printing 


38,000 


Advertising 


1,500 


Postage (Bulk) 


12,000 


Mailing Services 


5,400 


Commissions 


800 


Other Expenses 


1,660 



59,360 



199,385 



PEOPLE EXPENSES 

KPFK spends 8265,000 a year on 
salaries and benefits. 

S1,500/mo. on medical coverage 
(S18,000''year) 
S20,000/mo. on salaries 
(S240,000/year) 

S7,000/year on vacation replacements 

The breakdown: 

S10,000/year for full-time staff 

SI I.OOO/year for department directors 

S12,000/year for management 

S15,000/year for general manager 

While we were able to pay a 14.59-4 
pay increase from October through 
June of this past year, we have had 
to return to our current salary lev- 
els pending an increase in the Fall 
Drive totals. 



OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 9 




Sour 

Apple 

Tree 



No Quick Fix 

We thought of our programming for 
this Fall's Fund Drive with two 
phone calls from listeners burning 
in our memories: A man complains 
that although he earns S30,000 a 
year, his buying power is less now 
than when he earned $15,000. He 
blames this on the poor and upon 
social programs financed by the state. 
Another man calls a show which dis- 
cusses the need to convert "defense" 
industries to non-military production. 
'But we need jobs," he objects, not 
hearing, or not believing. Perhaps he 
sees nothing wrong with U.S. foreign 
policy, perhaps he cannot imagine 
any kind of social transformation 
which will improve his life, let alone 
protect himself and his family. 

Such attitudes, widely shared am- 
ong the petit bourgeoisie and work- 
ing class, provide the social basis for 
fascism. It is this possiblity that we 
address in our Fall programming. As 
we observe. the alarming rate of cor- 
porate mergers, the collapse of lib- 
eral opposition in Congress, the grow- 
ing consolidation of monopoly in 
mass media. We and our listeners 
wonder, "Can It Happen Here?" 

The October 7 Teach-in on "Rea- 
ganomics, the Corporate State and 
the Future of Democracy" tackles 
this momentous and difficult ques- 
tion. Other special programs this 
month elaborate on the provoca- 
tions of the Reagan Administration: 
heightened racism and sexism, the 
effects of budget cuts on women 
and minorities, and the future of 
the arts and humanities (particu- 
larly those that foster critical con- 
sciousness—see Edward Said's re- 
marks which follow). 

We hope that these and all our 
other programs will provide the 
genuinely alternative analysis that 
justifies listener-sponsorship: one 
with a moral and critical dimension 
missing in the rest of media. Dur- 
ing the second half of our fund 
drive in November we follow these 
"provocations" with an examina- 
tion of how Americans are respond- 
ing: passivity and activitv. We will 



OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 10 



look at the culture of apathy, at 
paranoia, sado-masochism, nihilism, 
and the revolt against modernity. 
We will then assess the position and 
direction of contemporary 'social 
movements. And most importantly, 
we will return to our Pacifica ar- 
chives to take a fresh look at the 
'60s in order to counter what Peter 
Lyman has described as the de- 
politicization of the Vietnam War 
and its transformation into questions 
of individual psychology— veterans' 
benefits and veterans' violence. It is, 
of course, the right-wing strategy to 
obliterate the memory of the '60s 
when a powerful anti-imperialist con- 
sensus developed, the better to justi- 
fy American intervention in Central 
America and Africa, should that be 
necessary. 

A few words about music program- 
ming. We are in the process of form- 
ing a music advisory committee, con- 
sisting of composers, performers, 
critics, historians, and musicologists. 

As we consider the future of mu- 
sic and other cultural programming 
at KPFK, we invite your thoughts as 
to how all our programming in the 
arts could best serv? a diverse commu- 
nity where cultural preferences have 
been misused to pit people against 
each other. In other words, as we 
diversify our cultural programming, 
how can we unify, rather than frag- 
ment our audience? I invite your 
continued response to these ques- 
tions and offer an excerpt from Ed- 
ward Said's essay which will, I hope, 
illuminate and extend" what I have 
been trying to say here for the last 
seven months. 



Clare Spark 
Program Director 



Excerpt from Edward Said, "Zionism 
from the Standpoint of Its Victims," 
Social Text, Vol. 1 No. 1, Winter 
1979. 

In the particular case of the Pales- 
tinian/Zionism conflict a group of 
important issues proposes itself for 
radical intellectual analysis and cri- 
tique. That there is an impasse now, 
that real peace seems so far-fetched 
and remote a possibility and, worst 
of all, that Western metropolitan in- 
tellectuals see the situation as so 
entirely confused as to be left to 
the "expert" crisis-managers: all 
these are symptoms of the failure 
to be critical, of the failure of in- 
tellectuals to contribute in intellec- 
tual production to the political strug- 
gle. After all, since as human beings 
we exist in the same world with the 
not-so-far-away peoples of the Third 
World, why should vje not therefore 
undertake seriously to understand, 
and fight against, the hegemony of 
imperialist culture, especially when 
it means deserting the hermeticism 
of metaphysical cobweb spinning, 
and resolving to try reading and 
writing history for a change? 

I conclude therefore with a brief 
enumeration of questions— problems 
— requiririg precisely the kind of op- 
positional attention I have been dis- 
cussing since, it is my contention, 
intellectual matters, no less than 
"practical" ones, produce the world 
in which ultimately we all live. 

1. Human rights: how is the mat- 
ter of US/USSR detente to be dis- 
entangled from an intricate set of 
other interests: the problem of dissi- 
dents in the Soviet Union; the pri- 
vilege of Zionism over every other 
Sovret nationality problem in the 



Soviet system and the achievement 
of a special status for Jewish immi- 
gration to Israel out of the USSR; 
the lack of attention paid by the 
Zionist organizations to persecution 
of Jews in Argentina and the absence 
of a campaign to help Jews emigrate 
to Israel from, say, Latin America; 
the necessity for Isi^ael of maintaining 
a continual flow of European Jews 
into ttie country in order to keep 
control— indefinitely— over enormous 
Arab territory (possibly greater than 
what Israel now holds, including 
Transjordan itself) and to keep dom- 
inance in the hands of Ashkenazim 
in a country that is demographically 
"Oriental" (the similarity, and hence 
the rationale for alliance, with right- 
wing Maronites in Lebanon); the ex- 
ploitation versus the necessity of nev- 
er forgetting Nazi genocide practiced 
against European Jews, all that con- 
nected with the slow re-emergence 
of anti-Semitism in the West, the 
general intellectual and cultural swing 
to the right, the submission of intel- 
lectuals to control of the state; the 
rise of state-worship. 

2. The complex problem of vio- 
lence, state terrorism, the limits and 
the theory of revolutionary armed 
struggle, its limitations and its pit- 
falls particularly as a result of the 
neglect of cultural struggle. 

. . . .What has been the intellectuals' 
role in legitimating not only the state, 
but the state's pretense to all rights, 
all legitimacy, all values? The rela- 
tionship in such instances between 
the intellectuals, the mass media, 
cultural stereotypes, and the con- 
stant latency of violence needs care- 
ful study. 

3. Free debate, cultural pluralism, 
absence of censorship, cultural free- 
dom: these also are much discussed, 
and left stupidly unattended to by 
literary intellectuals who on the one 
hand inveigh against liberalism, pro- 
claim the clangers of the right-wing, 
the dangers of thought-control and 
consumerism, and, on the other hand, 
live quite happily in an unanalyzed 



system of media monopoly, press 
and publishing censorship, news doc- 
toring, and other forms of cultural 
violence. What is the relationship be- 
tween late capitalism and the various 
forms of cultural hegemony, between 
domination and persuasion, between 
the mores of the academy and those 
of business and government? 

4. Finally, (a) what role as a pro- 
ducer of criticism and historical know- 
ledge does the Western Intellectual 
p'j/ jiven the background of Occi- 
dental domination and oppression of 
the non-Occidental world; (b) what 
is the meaning of community given 
the construction and abuse of Others 
—women, blacks, Palestinians, etc.— 
and given also the sustained produc- 
tion of alienating technological dis- 
courses (colluded in by liberal intel- 
lectuals) in the advanced capitalist 
world? 

To this cluster of problems the 
critical consciousness can respond 
only with: the study of history, a 
belief in rational knowledge, a strong 
sense of what political life is all 
about, a set of values grounded ab- 
solutely in human community, de- 
mocracy, and faith in the future. 
Thus do theory and praxis become 
aspects of each other, when intel- 
lectual work more closely approach- 
es political worldliness, and when the 
study of culture is activated by val- 
ues. Ideals, and political commit- 
ment. In no way, however, do I ad- 
vocate the abandonment either of 
theory or of one's sense of free and 
complete intellectual activity. On 
the contrary, it is those alone that 
enable one fully to be, to participate, 
in history. 



OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 11 



JOHN CAGE: An Interviev* 



The following is the second and con- 
cluding part of an interview of com- 
poser John Cage by Roger Reynolds. 
This article also appears In Contem- 
porary Composers on Contemporary 
Music, Elliot Schwartz and Barney 
Childs, editors. Da Capo Press, 1967. 



Roger Reynolds: In a lecture in 1937 
you said, "the principle of form will 
be our only constant connection with 
the past." You went on to Identify 
this connection as "the principle of 
organization, or man's common abi- 
lity to think." Later you would asso- 
ciate form with the "morphology of 
a continuity" and "expressive con- 
tent." Would you trace your develop- 
ing view of form? 

John Cage: I'm now more involved in 
cfeorganization and a state of mind 
which in Zen is called no-mindedness. 
Those statements, given in 1937, are 
given as a sort of landmark to let the 
reader know from where I set out. 
There are certain things in that lec- 
ture that I would agree with and 
some that I would not. I imagine 
that when I used the word form 
then, that I meant what I later called 
structure (the divisibility of a whole 
into parts). Later I used form in the 
same sense that people generally use 
the word content (that aspect of com- 
position which is best able to be free, 
spontaneous, heartfelt, and so on). 
That attitude towards form is sort 
of in the middle, between my pres- 
ent thought and my early thought. 
Now I don't bother to use the word 
form, since I am involved in making 
processes, the nature of which I don't 
foresee. How can I speak of form? 
RR: A chronological sampling of 
your work would seem to indicate 
that each successive composition im- 
plements a new idea. That is, instead 
of a fresh manipulation or reordering 
of accepted terms within a style, you 
manipulate styles or ideas within a de- 
v«!ioping philosophical view. 

JC: I don't understand the question. 



RR: Most composers operate within 
a certain style or idiom, and they have 
set materials which they manipulate. 
Their compositions, each one after the 
other, become no more, nor less, than 
a careful new ordering of the same 
factors. It has seemed to me in look- 
ing at your activities chronologically 
that your works continually evince a 
new manipulation of ideas on a level 
abstracted from things. Each new 
piece puts into effect a new manifes- 
tation of style or idea in some way, 
and that the continuity in your work 
is a developing view of desirable 
actions. 

JC: Oh, yes, I'm devoted to the 
principle of originality. Not originali- 
ty in the egoistic sense, but originality 
in the sense of doing something which 
it is necessary to do. Now, obviously, 
the things that it is necessary to do 
are not the things that have been done, 
but the ones that have not yet been 
done. This applies not only to other 
people's work, but seriously to my 
own work; that is to say, if I have 
done something, then I consider it my 
business not to do that, but to find 
what must be done next. 
RR: Why are you in the habit of pre- 
senting your lectures in some unu- 
sual manner? As an example, in the 
extremely repetitious Lecture on 
Nothing, you periodically say, "if 
anybody is sleepy let him go to sleep." 
JC: If a lecture is informative, then 
people can easily think that some- 
thing is being done to them, and that 
they don't need to do anything about 
it except receive. Whereas, if I give a 
lecture in such a way that is not 
clear what is being given, then people 
have to do something about it. 
RR: In the lecture Compos/r/o^ as 
Process, you state that, around 1950, 
you viewed composition as "an acti- 
vity integrating the opposites, the ra- 
tional and the irrational, bringing 
about, ideally, a freely moving con- 
tinuity within a strict division of 
parts, the sounds, their combina- 
tions and succession being logically 
related or arbitrarily chosen." Later 



you refer to composition as involving 
processes not objects. Would you com 
ment on how your view has altered 
during the last few years? 

JC: Yes. It is still involved with pro- 
cess and not with object. The differ- 
ence is specifically the difference, say, 
between an ash tray and the whole 
room. Ash tray can be seen as having 
beginning and end, and you can con- 
centrate on it. But when you begin to 
experience the whole room— not ob- 
ject, but many things— then: where is 
the beginning? where is the middle? 
where is the end? It is clearly a ques- 
tion not of an object but rather of a 
process, and finally, that process has 
to be seen as subjective to each in- 
dividual. 

RR: It is the process of one's obser- 
vation, not the physical fact. . . 

JC: Yes, and that is why I want to get 
it so that people realize that they them- 
selves are doing their experience, and 
that it's not being done to them. Then 
coming back to that question on form. 
I thought of something else to say. 
When I say that, "I am not interested 
in form," or "how can I use the word 
form," I have to ask another question, 
namely, where do we see any form- 
lessness? Particularly nowadays with 
telescopes, with microscopes, etc., as 
one of my painter friends, Jasper 
Johns, says, "the world is very busy." 
Form everywhere. 
RR: What relation has "cause and 
effect" to your work? 
JC: That, again, is like the attitude 
toward symbol; rather than see that 
one thing has a given effect, we want 
to see that one thing has all effects. 
RR: The notion of causality has been 
much too simple in the past, there is 
such a multitude of causes and effects, 
and their interrelationships are so 
complex. . . 

JC: That is the real situation: that 
everything causes everything else. 
In other words, it is much more com- 
plicated than our scientists like to 
admit. 



Oi rOBER FOLIO PA (, I 



with Roger Reynolds 



RR: For example, the development 
of relativity has put Newton's laws 
in an unexpected perspective. One 
discovers that the neat mottos which 
we have for dealing with life are of- 
ten inaccurate. 

JC: And if I feel the weight, for in- 
stance, of my responsibility, then 
I'm simply ignorant of the effects 
of my actions, because they have 
effects which don't happen to cause 
me to think about them. 
RR: Some composers recently have 
admitted a degree of chance to their 
compositions but have retained gen- 
erally traditional methods by and 
large. You have noted that this prac- 
tice reveals a "carelessness with re- 
gard to the outcome." Would you 
elaborate on that comment? 
JC: If one is making an object and 
then proceeds in an indeterminate 
fashion to let happen what will, out- 
side of one's control, then one is 
simply being careless about the ma- 
king of that object. 
RR: You don't think, then, that it 
is valid for a composer to wish that 
a certain aspect or section of his 
work will have a changing face while 
the general language and substance 
remains controlled? 

JC: I think I know what you're re- 
ferring to and it's a very popular field 
of activity among composers at the 
present time. That is to say, to have 
certain aspects of a composition con- 
trolled, if I understand you, and others 
uncontrolled. Well, what is maintained 
here is the concept oi pairs of oppo- 
sites: having black and white, as it 
were, and then composing with the 
play of these opposites. One can then 
engage in all of the games that aca- 
demic composition has led us to know 
how to play. One can balance this with 
that, produce climaxes, and so on. 
I'm afraid all I can say is that it doesn't 
interest me. It doesn't seem to me to 
radically change the situation from 
the familiar convention. It simply 
takes these new ways of working and 
consolidates them with the old know- 
ledges, so that one remains at home 
with one's familiar ideas of the dra- 
ma—of the play of the opposites. So, 



one wouldn't have to change one's 
mind. Whereas, I think we are in a 
more urgent situation, where it is 
absolutely essential for us to change 
our minds fundamentally. And in 
this sense, I could be likened to a 
fundamentalist Protestant preacher. 
Stockhausen has recently employed a 
system of composition which in- 
volves the selection of one technique 
at a time from a number of different 
ways of working, and an attempt to 
let any one of them move into play. 
This gives the impression of a rich 
reservoir of contemporary techniques, 
so that in a repertoire of say seven or 
eight compositional techniques, in- 
determinacy would play the part of 
one, and you could call on it, as it 
were, when you had some use for it. 
But, that doesn't require a change of 
mind from what one previously had, 
and so nothing fundamentally dif- 
ferent is taking place. I think one 
could see it very clearly in terms of 
painting. You could have certain 
parts of a canvas controlltd and others 
quite chaotic, and so you would be 
able to play, as it were, in the same 
way in which you had played before. 
What we need is a use of our Art 
which alters our lives— is useful in 
our lives. We are familiar with those 
plays of balance, so they couldn't 
possibly do anything more to us, no 
matter how novel they were, than 
they already have done. "New wine 
in old bottles." 

Robert Ashley: It seems to me that 
your influence on contemporary mu- 
sic, on "musicians," is such that the 
entire metaphor of music could change 
to such an extent that— time being up- 
permost as a definition of music— the 
ultimate result would be a music that 
wouldn't necessarily involve anything 
but the presence of people. That is, 
it seems to me that the most radical 
redefinition of music that I could 
think of would be one that defines 
"music" without reference to sound. 



JC: Oh, yes, I made some use of that 
in my silent piece. [Ed. note: Mr. 
Cage has written a piece (4'33") 
which directs the performer (if he is 
a pianist) to come on stage, seat him- 
self at a piano for a specified time 
without engaging in any other acti- 
vity than the delineation, by some 
means, of the three movements of 
the composition. At the end of the 
designated time, the performer rises 
and leaves the room without having 
made any intentional sounds.] 

RA: It doesn't strike me as being 
that. 

JC: But that involves a number of 
people being together, and there are 
no special sounds. 
RA: If our awareness of time in- 
creased to such a degree that it didn't 
require that we be informed of time 
through the medium of sound— if our 
awareness of time became enlarged 
or changed to a really radical degree 
—then it's conceivable that we would 
do away with sound. 
JC: But we can't. You see there are 
always sounds. 

RR: This has to do with the distinc- 
tion that Mr. Cage has made between 
sound and silence: that the former 
consists of sounds that are intended, 
while the latter allows the sound 
which occurs unbidden in the envi- 
ronment to be heard. 
JC: Yes. 

RR: So that what you are saying, in 
essence, is that we might do away 
with intended sounds. 

RA: Well, let me put it this way. We 
might have a piece from which one par- 
ticipant would come, and, upon being 
questioned, would say that the occa- 
sion was marked by certain sounds. 
Another person might say that he 
didn't remember any sounds. There 
was something else. But they both 
would agree that a performance of 
music had taken place. 



continued on page 35, 



OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 13 



Prescription for Survival 



The following article originally ap- 
peared in the Los Angeles County 
Medical Association Physician, ./t/ne 
22, 1981 edition. It addresses many 
of the issues examined in our own 
Prescription for Survival, heard every 
second and fourth Tuesday of the 
month at 7:30. Check listings for 
details. 

Doctors Should Be Concerned about 

the Medical Consequences of Nuclear 

War 

by Samuel I. Roth ,M.D. 

In this nuclear age mankind faces an 
unprecedented threat to its survival. 
Events in recent months have increased 
the risk of conflict between the U.S. 
and Russia, and the use of nuclear 
weapons could ultimately be expect- 
ed if open warfare starts. 

As the size of the nuclear arsenals 
increases so does the risk. There are 
more than 40,000 nuclear devices, 
the combined explosive power of 
which is believed to exceed that of 
more than one-million Hiroshima 
bombs. Accidentally or intentionally, 
a nuclear exchange becomes more 
likely as the systems become more 
complex and more countries develop 
their own nuclear weapons. Malfunc- 
tioning computers or human derange- 
ment could accidentally trigger a nu- 
clear missile resulting in a massive 
nuclear exchange which would cause 
70-million to 160-million deaths in 
the U.S.A.' 

We have been reassured in the past 
that deterrence between the super- 
powers would prevent war, but now 
we hear strident talk of winning a nu- 
clear war through a first strike strate- 
gy. Nuclear war, unthinkable in the 
past, is now proposed by some mem- 
bers of our government and military, 
and the death of millions of our coun- 
trymen is considered an acceptable 
loss. 

Both the U.S. and Russia now have 
the capability of destroying each other 
several times over and there is no pos- 
sible defense. In the late 1960s for- 
mer Secretary of Defense Robert Mc- 
Namara stated that just 10% of the 
then existing nuclear arsenal of both 



OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 14 



the U.S. and Russia could effectively 
wipe out each nation's capability to 
function as a major industrial power. 

In 1962, a series of articles in the 
New England Journal of Medicine^ 
outlined the results of a "limited" nu- 
clear strike against Boston. The blast, 
firestorm and ionizing radiation were 
estimated to kill about one-third of 
a metropolitan population of three 
million people. Another million, who 
survived the acute effects would die 
of delayed injuries. Ninety percent 
of physicians would be killed or in- 
jured and the vast majority of hospi- 
tal beds would be destroyed. Calcu- 
lations have been made for other cit- 
ies and comparable losses have been 
estimated.' 

Other effects which have been con- 
sidered possible are a decrease in the 
stratopheric ozone layer which would 
greatly increase the incidence of skin 
cancer, crop failures from alteration 
in insect ecology and worldwide radi- 
ation effects. 

Most of us have grown up with "The 
Bomb" threat and we may have lost 
the capacity to respond as we should 
to this threat. When faced with such 
an overwhelming catastrophic event 
as nuclear war we tend to use denial 
as a mechanism of coping. This deep 
fear can have a paralyzing effect, but 
it could, just as well, motivate us to 
act constructively. 

Continuing the arms race at its pres- 
ent pace is inviting disaster. Untold 
millions of people will die and as 
many will suffer in a nuclear war. 
Physicians as a group have the res- 
pect and credibility to influence in- 
ternational policy. We understand 
the near futility of planning for me- 
dical care in the aftermath of a nu- 
clear exchange, and therefore we 
must convince our leaders to reduce 
the risk of nuclear war through ne- 
gotiations with other nuclear pow- 
ers. Verifiable reduction of the nu- 
clear arsenals in the world must be 
accomplished; at the same time our 
national security must be assured. 

What can physicians do? Roger J. 
Bulger MD, President of the Univer- 
sity of Texas Health Science Center 



in Houston, offers one answer: "It 
can be strongly argued that nuclear 
holocaust is the greatest threat to the 
health and propagation of the human 
race, and therefore it seems appro- 
priate and desirable for organized 
medicine and physicians to become 
educated and in turn, to educate our 
public and political leaders about the 
health implications of even a limited 
nuclear exchange. 

"Our job as physicians is to warn 
against the health dangers of nuclear 
war and as citizens to find a way to 
maintain our defenses and our free- 
dom."^ 

Dr. Bulger's is not the only voice 
to speak out on the subject.'* Physi- 
cians from the U.S., Russia and Eur- 
ope have met to discuss this issue. 
Recently, the CMA House of Dele- 
gates endorsed a resolution asking 
the AMA to petition the World Medi-' 
cal Association to hold an interna- 
tional convocation of physicians 
from all the world's nuclear powers 
to discuss the medical consequences 
and prevention of nuclear war. 

A national organization. Physicians 
for Social Responsibility (PSR), has 
formed as a nonprofit group dedica- 
ted to educating physicians and the 
public about the medical effects of 
nuclear v,/ar. Among its sponsors are 
Sidney Alexander MD of the Lahey 
Clinic Foundation; George N. Berdell 
MD, University of Iowa College of Me- 
dicine; Helen Caldicott MB, BS, PSR 
President, Harvard Medical School; 
Oliver Cope MD, Harvard Medical 
School; H. Jack Geiger MD, City Col- 
lege of New York; Bernard Lown MD, 
Harvard School of Public Health; John 
P. Merrill MD, Harvard Medical School; 
Joans Salk MD, Salk Institute, 

To date, there are 15 chapters in 
the U.S. The newly formed Los Ange- 
les chapter sponsorship includes Ro- 
ger Detels MD, Dean of the UCLA 
School of Public Health, Charles Klee- 
man MD of the UCLA School of Me- 
dicine, Daniel Simmons MD, PhD 
and Irwin Ziment MD, both profes- 
sors at UCLA. 

continued on page 34. 



Thinking Pacifica 



These Folio pages from March, 1960 demonstrate how 
times have changed and how Pacifica's mission was 
expressed in a different time. It is valuable for us to 
consider these differences and similarities, and stimu- 
lating to our current programming efforts to see how 
others interpreted the Pacifica mission. 



THURSDAY, March 16 

11:30 CHORAL CONCERT 

BACH Canlala No. 170 "Vergnuegte Ruh" 

Bavarian Stale/Lehmann (Decca 9682) (22) 
GREGORIAN CHANT Ascension Mass 

Monks of Abbey St. Pierce Solesmes/Dom 
Gaiard (London 5242) (21) 
VERDI Te Deum 

Shaw Chorale/Shaw; NBC Sym/Toscanini 
(Victor LM-1849) (16) 
MACHAUT Messc de Nostre Dame 

Pro Musica Antiqua/Capc (Archive 3032) (29) 

1:M TEA CEREMONY OF JAPAN: What do 
you know about this 400-year old relieious rile? 
Rose Behar describes the ceremony and its 
symbolism, and adds some thoughts on Japanese 
culture. 

2:00 PHILOSOPHY EAST AND WEST: Alan 
Watts. (Mar. 12) 

2:30 CONSUMER TO CONSUMER: Dave and 
Sara MacPhcrson with guides for the wary buyer, 
(Mar. 10) 

2:45 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH AND RUS- 
SI.AN: Lesson 19 conducted by Leonid Belozubov 
of Santa Monica City College. (Mar. 15) 

3:00 THE MUSIC OF BEETHOVEN 

Diabelli Variations. Opus 120 

Shure. piano (Epic 3382) (53) 
Fuer Elisc. and Minuet in G 

Balsam, piano (Wash 401) (3.2) 
Trio in Eflat. Opus 70. No. 2 

Istomin. Schneider. Casala (Col 4571) (31) 

4:30 PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN: See page 17 

5:30 RANGE OF OPINION: Victor Fcrkiss 

5:45 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ: Nat Hemoff. Martin 
Williams play records and discuss the jazz 
scene. 

6:45 COMMENTARY: Phil Kerby 

7:00 NEWS 

7:30 THE SULLEN ART: With Dave Ossman. 
Tonight. W. S. Merwin. whose latest book of 
poetry is the Drunk in the Furnace (Macmillan) 
discusses his place among contemporary writers 
and his reacti ns as poetry editor for The Na- 
tion. 

8:00 HARRISON BROWN. W. H. FERRY ANT) 
HERMAN KAHN— ON CIVIL DEFENSE: The 

question of a shelter program to defend civilians 
brings three quite different responses from the 
panelists. As they develop *their respective facts 
and opinions, the discussion ranges over real- 
politik. weaponry, military inOuence in go\ern- 
ment and Russian C. D. programs — which adds 
up to an informative 90 minutes. Harrison Brown 
is professor of geochemistry at Caltech and co- 
author of Community of Fear. W. H. Ferry is 



vice president of the Fund for the Republic. 
Herman Kahn of the Rand Corporation wrote 
the new book. On Thermonuclear War. Trevor 
Thomas is moderalor. Produced by Frances 
Quattrocchi and Arthur Wadsworth. A second 
program on the pr.icticahlies of civil defense 
may be heard on Friday. March 17 at 8; 15. 

9:30 SPECIAL REPORT: Brian Roper. 

9:45 MOZART: Quintet in D. K. 593 

Griller Quartet. Primrose (Van 1053) (25) 

10:15 THE BOOK CASE: Clifford Browder, poet 

and doctor of French literature from Columbia 
L'nivcrNJty. includes a survey of the history of 
surrealism in this review of Andre Breton's 
newly translated "Nadja" (Grove). 

10:45 FRENCH PRESS AND PERIODICALS 

11:00 ALLEN GINSBERG: The author of "Howl 
and Other Poems" .and more recently. "Kad- 
dish." ranges over such subjects as dope addic- 
tion, the New York police, the poetic experience. 
Fidel Castro and "the Beat scene." in a long 
conversation with Dave Ossman and Ann Guidice. 



FRIDAY, March 17 

11:30 ORCHESTRAL CONCERT 

MOZART (Overture to Magic Flute 

Hamburg Pro Musica/Newstone (Forum 70010) 

i«l 
SCHUM.-\NN Concerto in A minor for Piano 

and Orchestra. Op. 54 

Novacs; Vienna Pro Musica/Swarowsky (Vox 

113801 (-30) • 
MENNINI Arioso for Strings 

Eastman Rochester Hanson (Mer 50074) (6) 
PROKOFIEV Symphony No. 5. Op. 100 

Lon Sym Sargent I Everest 6304) (45) 

1:00 COMMENTS ON CUBA: Herbert Matthews 
of the New ^ork Times tells Jon Donald about 
the dilTcrence between U. S. and European atti- 
tudes toward the Cuban revoluiion and the 
probable development of other "Fidelista" gov- 
ernments in Latin America. Mr. Matthews is 
critical of American press coverage of the Castro 
revolution. (Mar 14) 

1:30 JOHN CIARDI ON CAMPUS: A simulated 
• interMcu of the poet, critic and translator, as 
reconstructed on the basis of his visit to Stetson 
University by novelist and teacher Guy Owen. 
The article appeared in Trace literary magazine. 
Julv-.August. 19611. It is read by Bill Pick and 
Satford Chamberlain. 

1:45 REPORT TO AND FROM THE LISTENER: 

Catherine Cory, the s-alT and guests discuss 
KPFK's progress, problems and listener letters. 

iMar 15) 

2:15 FOIR PROPOS.VLS: Scene from Shake- 



speare and Congreve: Taming of the Shrew, 
Richard III. Henry V. and Way of the World. 
With Del Parker and Vivian Schaffer. 

3:00 CONCERTO CONCERT 

MOZ-'sRT Concerto No. 1 in D for Horn and 

Orchestra. K. 412 

Brain; Philharmonia.'Karajan (Ang 35092) (8) 
SHOSTAKOVnCH Concerto for Violin and 

Orchestra. Opus 99 

Oistrakh; NY Phil/Mitropoulos (Col 5077) (36) 
BARTOK Concerto for Orchestra 

NY Phil Bernstein (Col 5471) (40) 

4:30 PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN: Seepage 17 

5:30 CHAMBER MUSIC 

KRENEK Piano Sonata No. 3. Opus 92 

Gould (Col 5336) (20) 
BABBITT Composition for Four Instruments 

Wummcr. Drucker. March. McCall (CRI 13«) 

(141 
BEETHOVEN Quartet. C-sharp minor, Opus 131 

Budapest (Col 4585) (39) 

6:45 COMMENTARY Dorothy Healy 

7:00 NEWS 

7:30 THE . GOON SHOW: The Spon Plague 
(whatever that is). 

«:00 SUPREME COURT DECISIONS: Lawrence 
Steinberg's review and analysis. 

«:15 THEORY AND PRACHCE OF CIVIL 
DEFENSE: We planned this discussion around 
the practicalities of blast and fallout shelters — 
from slit trench to game room. It gets to" this, 
but not before some vigorous theoretical dif- 
ferences are aired by Charles Denton, now radio- 
teevee editor for the Los Anceles Examiner, who 
covered the Nevada Tests (from a slit trench); 
Roy Hoover, coordinator of disaster services. 
Los Angeles County; Stanley Horn, whose firm 
builds shelters; and Daniel Weiler. research di- 
rector for Los Angeles and Hollywood chapters 
of the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear 
Policy. Second of three programs moderated by 
Trevor Thomas and produced by Frances Quat- 
trocchi and Arthur Wadsworth. 

9:30 KATHLEEN FERRIER: In a recital of 
Northumbrian. Elizabethan, and Irish folk songs. 
Phyllis Spurr at the piano. (Lon LL 541 1) (45) 

10:15 IN PERSPECTIVE: Second in a series of 

four reminiscences by famous people, produced 
by BBC. Tonight: Sir Julian Huxley. 

10:30 FROM HERE TO SUNDAY: American folk 
music with Ed Cray and occasional guests. 



SATURDAY, March 18 

11:30 BERLIOZ: Requiem 

Simoncau. New Enc Cons Cho/dc Varon; 
Boston Sym/Munch (Vic Soria Ld 6077) (88) 

1:00 RFPORT FROM IRAN: Marshall Wind- 
miller inierviewinp Nikki Keddie of the Scripps 
Colletic faculty who has recently returned from 
a len-monih stay in Iran. 

1:45 ROLE PLAYING AND MANAGEMENT 
SKILLS: Dr. Robert Bopuslaw. manager of Per- 
sonnel Development at the System Development 
Corporation in Santa Monica describes and 
demonMratcs — with the help of three volunteers 
— how the social science technique of role play- 



OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 15 



1 Thursday 



6:00 
9:00 



10:00 



11:00 



11:30 
12:00 



2:00 



6:00 
6:45 



7:15 



8:00 
9:00 



11:00 



11:30 
12:00 



Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 
This Morning. News, Charles 
Morgan Commentary, Read 
All About It, Calendar with 
Terry Hodel. 

Folkscene. Rick and Lorraine 
Lee perform traditional and 
contemporary folk music and 
original songs on dulcimer and ' 
electric piano. Roz and Howard 
Larman host. 

The Morning Reading. Dasheill 
Hammet's The Big Knockover, 
as read by Paul Boardman. 
Public Affairs Open Time. 
Noon Concert: Chapel, Court, 
and Countryside. Continuing 
with its series of rebroadcasts 
of earlier programs, with em- 
phasis on concsrts which ori- 
ginated live on C,C,&C's Mon- 
day evening programs. Joseph 
Spencer hosts. 

The Afternoon Air. Paul Lion 
with Media Rare, at 2:30, Grace 
Jacobs with Speal<ing of Seniors; 
at 3:00, news headlines with 
Marc Cooper; then. Bob Pugs- 
ley with Inside LA. Ax 4:00, 
Nawana Davis with Music Black 
and White; author Frank Don 
talks about "Earth Changes 
Ahead" with The Wizards. Fi- 
nally, Terry Hodel with Calendar 
The Evening News. 
Noticiero Pacifica. Treinta mi- 
nutes de los acontecemientos 
mas importantes de la semana. 
Voz y Raiz de Latino America. 
Revista radial de actualidad po- 
litica y cultural de y para la 
comunidad Latinoamericana 
residente en el sur de California. 
Pacifica Presents. 
Boston Symphony: Live in 
Concert. Tchaikovsky: Violin 
Concerto in D Major, op. 35; 
Beethoven: Symphony No. 7 
in A Major, op. 92. Joseph 
Silverstein is the soloist. Seiji 
Ozawa conducts. Stereo. Dolby 
Noise Reduction. Program sub- 
ject to change. 

Janus Company Radio Theater. 
KPFK's live playhouse featuring 
science fiction, mystery, and 
fantasy. 

The Late Night News, 
am Something's Happening! 
Night environments. Fundraising 
from 1-2 am. Roy of Hollywood 
hosts. 



2 Friday 



6:00 Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 
9:00 This Morning. News, Blase 
Bonpane Commentary, Mid 
die East In Focus with Michel 
Bogopolsky and Sarah Mardell, 
Terry Hodel with Calendar. 

10:00 Independent Music. With Mario 
Casetta. 

1 1 :00 The Morning Reading. We con- 
clude with Dasheill Hammet's 
The Big Knockover. Reader is 
Paul Boardman. 

11:30 Public Affairs Open Time. 

12:00 Noon Concert: Soundboard. 
Today's presentation features 
one of Canada's foremost play- 
ers, Michael Laucke, whose 
studies were with Bream, Se- 
govia, Diaz, and others. Music 
by Walton: Bagatelles; Bennett: 
Impromptus; plus chamber mu- 
sic for guitar/voice, guitar/flute/ 
voice, and the new recording of 
a 20 minute solo guitar piece 
by Canadian composer Fran- 
cois Morel. John Wager-Schnei- 
der hosts. 
2:00 The Afternoon Air. Portraits of 
the U.S.S.R.: a new series with 
interviews, panels, and commen- 
taries with people of varying or- 
ientations to Soviet history and 
society. At 3:00, Newswatch 
with Marc Cooper and Clare 
Spark, open phones for your 
analysis of the news media; then 
Just a Minute: The World This 
14'ee/f— discussion of world po- 
litics and culture; then. The 
Iron Triangle, a weekly phone 



call from Gordon Adams about 
the links between the military 
industry. Congress, and the Pen- 
tagon. Terry Hodel with Calen- 
dar to wrap things up. 

6:00 The Evening News. 

6:30 Open Journal. 

7:00 The Health Department. Poetry 
of the Earth. Tonight's program 
includes a Great Atlantic Radio 
Conspiracy production of poe- 
try from 1 5th century Japan to 
late 20th century America; from 
creation myths of the Australian 
Aranda to contemporary poems 
mourning the devestation of the 
land. Plus some other related mu- 
sic and poetry selected by host 
Al Huebner. 

8:00 Le Jazz Hot & Cool. John Breck 
ow hosts. 

10:00 Hour 25: Science Fiction. Mike 

Hodel and guests. 
12:00 am Straight, No Chaser. Jay 
Green hosts. 

2:00 am Listen to this Space. . . 



3 Saturday 



6:00 Morning of the World. 

7:30 Music of South Asia. Harihar 
Rao hosts. 

8:30 Fundraising. 

9:00 Friends, Lovers, and Family: 
Battling Sexism. Introduction 
to the day with Jeannie Pool 
and Don Cannon. Four Short 
Pieces: Jealousy and Possessive- 
ness; Honesty in Relationships; 
Who's in Your Family?; Think- 
ing About Having Children? 



:CV^. 



^ 



O^"^ 



isS 



-^-"V^"^ 



tlK0^ 



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(213) 985-5735 



OCTOBER FOLIO PACE 16 




lerry and Bev Praver are two of the per- 
formers featured in a live concert from 
Studio Z Saturday at 9 pm. 



10:30 

11:30 

12:00 

1:00 



2:00 



2:30 



3:00 



4:00 



6:00 
6:45 



7:15 



Intersperced pitching through- 
out the day. 

Halfway Down the Stairs. 
Uncle Ruthie reflects on her 
own strongest convictions 
about family and friendship 
on this special day. 
Non-Sexist Daycare in Los 
Angeles. With Suzi Weissman. 
Men with Children. With poet 
David Steinberg. 
Friends. A collage of poetry, 
song, personal statements on 
friendship. Produced collective- 
ly by friends Jeannie, Sheryl, 
Don, Sly, John, Suzi, and 
others. 

Battered Spouses or Battered 
Women? With Sherilyn Cana- 
dy of the Sojourn Battered 
Women's Shelter. 
Counseling Battering Men. 
With the L.A. Alternative to 
Violence. Produced by Don 
Cannon. 

Reproductive Rights. Couples 
talk about how they make 
decisions; panel discussion. 
The New Right's Plot to 
Destroy the Family. Panel 
discussion with Dave Dis- 
more, moderator; including 
Thomas Jablonsky, historian, 
University of Southern Cali- 
fornia Program for the Study 
of Women and Men in Soci- 
ety. 

The Evening News. 
ERA: This Year's Agenda. 
With Ginny Foat, California 
State Coordinator of NOW 
and Cooper Zaie. 
Love and Friendship between 
Women and Men: Is It Possible? 
People speak about what most 



influenced their concepts of 
the ideal mate; how to meet 
people; communication between 
women and men; building last- 
ing relationships. Produced by 
Sheryl Scarborough. 

9:00 Evening Concert: Live from 
Studio Z. Performance fea- 
turing Folkways recording 
artist Willie Sordill, Jerry and 
Bev Praver, Worfiansong with 
Julie North and Kass Krain, 
poet David Steinberg, and 
more. Hosts are John Paul of 
the Provisional Theatre and 
L.A, Men's Collective, and 
Jeannie Pool . 

11:00 Wrapup: Integrating Gender, 

Class, and Race. Listener phone 
calls inv'tad. 

12:00 am Maximum Rock & Roll. 
Host Tim Yohannan with 
special guests, rare recordings. 
2:00 am 2 O'Clock Rock. Post- 
punk music of 1981-2, often 
including not-yet-released 
albums, demo tapes, and ob- 
scure imports. (Did you know 
there are at least 18 different 
groups with records out in 
Rotterdam?) Music selected 
by Andrea 'Enthal and Robert 
Francis. 



4 Sunday 



6:00 



9:00 



Gospel Caravan. Prince Dixon 
pitches and plays to his gen- 
erous audience. 
Bio-Cosmology. Jack Gariss 
with some extra time this week. 

1 1 :30 Many Worlds of Music. A Tri- 
bute to Mike Janusz. Music lov- 
ers were saddened to hear of 
the untimely death of Mike 
Janusz, in July of 1981, a man 
who gave deep meaning to the 
presentation and performance 
of authentic ethnic music from 
many areas of Eastern Europe. 
Today's memorial will encom- 
pass biographical material and 
recorded selections covering 
20 years or more of activity. 
This tribute was conceived, 
edited and directed by Mallory 
Pearce, Victor Pierce, and Les- 
lie Janusz. Produced for KPFK- 
Pacifica by Mario Casetta. 

12:30 New Subscriber Search. 
1:00 The Sunday Opera. Boito: 
Mefistofele. Soloists Boris 
Christoff, Giancinto Pirandelli, 
Orietta Moscucci. Vittorio Gui 
conducts the Rome Ooera 



6:00 
6:30 



7:00 



House Orchestra and Chorus 
RCA Victor LM-6049. Fred 
Hyatt hosts, and invites you 
to call 985-5735 to renew, 
take out a gift subscription, 
or return to the fold. 

5:00 Beyond the Fragments. Carl 
Boggs with discussion and 
analysis of current national 
and international developments. 
Time out for fundraising alo.ng 
the way. 

The Sunday News. 
The Science Connection. Make 
the connection with usi Steve 
and Vera Kilston make an ap- 
peal for funds. 

Preaching the Blues. Mary Aldin 
pitches and plays black gospel, 
blues, and boogie woogie. New 
releases, and the music of George 
"Wild Child" Butler and Albert 
Collins; and interview with Al- 
bert Collins, taped during a re- 
cent West Coast tour. 

8:30 Overnight Productions / IMRU. 
News, features, calendar, and 
some fundraising. 

9:30 Folkscene. Scheduled guests 
this evening are the mandolin 
and guitar duo of Orin Starr 
and Gary Mehalick. Howard 
and Roz Larman host and 
pitch. 
12:00 am Smoke Rings. John Breckow, 
jazz, and conversation. 



5 Monday 



6:00 



9:00 



9:30 



11:00 



11:30 
12:00 



2:00 



Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 
Fundraising from 8:00 to 9:00. 
This Morning. News and Com- 
mentary from Phyllis Bennis. 
Folkdance with Mariol Mario 
with some extra time to entice 
new subscribers, and to pro- 
vide his loyal audience with 
his special brand of music. 
The Morning Reading. Today 
we begin a rebroadcast of 
Testimony: The Memoirs of 
Dmitri Shostakovich. Gary 
Kern reads. Theme music is 
String Quartet No. 8. 
Public Affairs Open Time. 
Noon Concert with Jeannie 
Pool. Fundraising for the 1st 
half hour; then, music by con- 
temporary women composers. 
Alan Watts. "Solid Emptiness," 
part 3 of a 4 part seminar. 
(Madhyamika). Tiie way of 
liberation according to Nagar- 
juma's negation of all intel- 
lectual "hangups"; and its ex- , 



nrrriRFR fdi in pagf n 



6:00 
6:45 
7:00 
7:30 
8:00 

8:30 



9:00 



pression in the literature of 
the Prajnaparamita (or wisdom 
for crossing to the Other Shore). 
From MEA' Box 303, Sausa- 
lito, CA 94965. (Rebroad- 
cast at midnight tonight.) 

3:00 The Afternoon Air. News head- 
lines with Marc Cooper; Organic 
Gardening with Will Kinney and 
Barbara Spark; Gary Richwald 
with Body Politics. Pitching 
around and in between. Terry 
Hodel with Calendar. 
The Evening News. 
Comment: Charles Morgan. 
Time to Fundraise. 
Labor Scene. Sam Kushner. 
Pitchers Warm Up to New 
Subscribers. 

Family Tree. Exploration of 
issues and concerns of the 
black community. Sylvester 
Rivers is producer/host. 
Chapel, Court, and Countryside. 
Host Joseph Spencer with a 
leisurely exploration of the 
world of early music; and some 
fundraising (time to show your 
appreciation). 

10:30 In Fidelity. First Monday of 
the month is Beginner's Night 
on KPFK's weekly audio pro- 
gram. Basic information for 
audiophiles and nonaudiophiles, 
with open phones. Peter Sut- 
heim answers your questions, 
and in turn asks you to call in 
your pledges. 

12:00 am Something's Happening! 
Fundraising to 12:30. Then 
Alan Watts speaks on "Solid 
Emptiness" part 3. At 1 ;30, 
"The Healing Brain" part 1 
with David S. Sobel, MD. He 
introduces the symposium with 
a discussion on psychosomatic 
health, the will to live. The sys- 
tems view allows us a look at 
disease that shows the ripple 
effect up through tissue level 
to the social level (15 min.). 
At 1 :45, "The Healing Brain" 
Symposium, part 2 with James 
J. Lynch, Ph.D., professor of 
psychology. University of Mary- 
land School of Medicine and 
scientific director of the psy- 
chophysiological clinic and 
laboratories. He says most psy- 
chosomatic disease results from 
hyperactivity of the autonomic 
nervous system in response to 
interpersonal relationships. In 
most settings we are unaware 
of this body reaction. Dr. Lynch 
also demonstrates the medical 
consequences of loneliness and 
the importance of human com- 



panionship (1 hr, 9 min). Pro- 
duced by Margaret Fowler. (Con- 
tinues next week.) Fundraising 
to 4. Open programming to 6. 



6 Tuesday 



6:00 Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 
9:00 Request for Funds. The num- 
ber to call is 985-5735. 
10:00 This Morning. News, Charles 
Morgan Commentary (rebr.). 
Read All About It, Terry 
Hodel with Calendar. 
11:00 The Morning Reading. Gary 
Kern continues his reading 
of Testimony: The Memoirs 
of Dmitri Shostal<ovich. 
11:30 Public Affairs Pitch. 
12:00 Noon Concert: At the Key - 
board .with Leonid Hambro. 
Live music and some lively 
fundraising. 
2:00 The Afternoon Air. Pitching 
at strategic moments. First, 
an interview with Stuart Ewen, 
author of Captains of Con- 
sciousness— ho\N American 
advertising sold consumerism 
to the American public in 
the 1920's and after. At 3:00, 
news headlines with Marc 
Cooper; then, American Indian 
Airwaves with Liz Lloyd. At 
4:00, Tom Nixon (no relation) 
with The Nixon Tapes; at 5:00, 
Gary Lowe's Newsweek: a new 
program about local and state 
politics. Today's guest is Joel 
Wachs, President of the L.A. 
City Council. Terry Hodel 
with Calendar. 
6:00 The Evening News. 
6:45 Ongoing Search for new sub- 
scribers. Seen any? Tell them 
to call 985-5735. 
7:30 Help Is on the Way. Clinical 
psychologist Steve Portuges 
with discussion of the mental 
health profession. Open phones. 
Some fundraising, too. 
8:30 Tuesday Evening Concert. 

And an appeal for funds. 
10:30 Musicof South Asia. With 
Harihar Rao. Pitching, too. 
12:00 am Centerstand. Motorcycle 
talk with Richard Hill, Roy 
Tuckman, and guests. Taped 
productions by Margaret Fow- 
ler and technical assistance by 
Diane Schmidt. 
1:30 am Something's Happening! 

Fundraising for one hour. Open 
time til 4. Jack Gariss with 
BioCosmology. 



7 Wednesday 



6:00 Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 

Fundraising at 7;00; then, 

more music. 
9:00 This Morning. Abbreviated 

version: news and commentary 
9:30 This Morning's Pitch. 
10:00 Folkdance with Mario! Pitch 

and play with Mario. 



Centerstand; all about motorcycles 
Tuesdays, midnight. 




OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 18 




11:30 
12:00 



2:00 



11:00 The Morning Reading. Testi- 
mony: The Memoirs of Dmi- 
tri Shostal<ovich. Gary Kern 
reads. 

Public Affairs Open Time. 
Noon Concert: William Mal- 
loch Programme. Pitching 
and playing. 

The Afternoon Air. In pre- 
paration for tonight's Teach- 
in, an afternoon of short pro- 
grams about the growth of 
the corporate state, Reagan- 
omics, and the likelihood of 
increased govern.Tient repres- 
sion. Highlights from a recent 
conference on Reaganomics 
at UCLA. Interspersed with 
pitching. Calendar with Terry 
Model. 

The Evening News. 
Musical Interlude. With fund- 
raising interludes. 
Teach-in on Reaganomics, the 
Corporate State, and the Fu- 
ture of Democracy. Live from 
Studio Z, a definitive look at 
the current political, economic, 
and social climate in the Uni- 
ted States. Issues to be exa- 
mined include the transfer of 
fi'nding away from social pro- 
grams and toward the military; 
the importance of Reagan for- 
eign policy in influencing do- 
mestic policy; and more. You 
are invited to participate di- 



6:00 
6:30 

8:00 



TEACH-IN ON REAGANOMICS, 

THE CORPORATE STATE, AND THE FUTURE OF DEMOCRACY 

Wednesday, October 7, 8:00 pm 

This special program comes to you live from our Studio Z and will 
take a definitive look at the current political, economic, and social 
climate in the United States. You are invited to participate in our 
live, in-studio audience for this event so that you can directly ques- 
tion our panel of experts and analysts. 

Under discussion this evening will be the transfer of funding away 
from social programs and toward the military; the importance of 
Reagan foreign policy in Influencing domestic policy; the conscious- 
ness of the middle class and the working class, and to what degree 
we are experiencing a new period of repression and restriction of 
civil liberties. 

This program will explore such frequently heard sentiments as 
"Reagan is looking out for the little guy and getting big govern- 
ment off our backs." This program was partially inspired by a 
phone call from a KPFK listener who said he was angry at peo- 
ple because he now earns 530,000 a year and yet has less pur- 
chasing power than when he earned half that amount. The caller 
went on to blame "those people on welfare" for his dropoff in 
living standards. In the fear that such sentiments as these could 
lead toward a new authoritarianism in the U.S., KPFK presents 
tonight's program in the spirit of trying to understand the com- 
plex forces now at play in our society. 

Please come down and join us for this live program. Phone 213- 
877-2711 during business hours to make your reservations. 



nCTOBFR mil' 



rectly by joining us in studio. 
Call 877-2711 during business 
hours to reserve your seat. 
For more information, see 
accompanying box. 
12:00 am Something's Happening! 
Night environments. Fund- 
raising from 3-4 am. Roy of 
Hollywood hosts. 



8 Thursday 



6:00 
8:30 

9:30 



10:00 



11:00 

12:00 

2:00 



6:00 
6:45 



7:15 
8:00 

9:00 



Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 
Appeal to Early Morning 
Listeners. 

This Morning. Abbreviated 
version, with news and com- 
mentary from Charles Morgan. 
Folkscene. Hammered dulcimer 
player John McCutcheon is 
today's guest, performing tra- 
ditional and contemporary 
folk music. Howard and Roz 
Larman host. 

Fundraising Time Again. Call 
your friends and tell them to 
call us: 985-5735. 
Noon Concert: Chapel, Court, 
and Countryside. Early music 
and fundraising. 
The Afternoon Air. Highlights 
from our recent Teach-in on 
South Africa, with special fo- 
cus 9n the U.S. position in 
that country. At 4:00, Nawana 
Davis with Music Black and 
White, with a pitch here and 
there. At 5:00, The Wizards 
talk about comets and why 
you should subscribe to KPFK. 
If not you, then your neigh- 
bor, friend, adversary...—? 
Terry Model with Calendar. 
The Evening News. 
Noticiero Pacifica. Treinta mi- 
nutes de los acontecemientos 
mas importantes de la semana. 
Voz V Raiz de Latino America. 
With some fundraising. 
Prophets and Other Trouble- 
nnakers. Progressive religion? 
What's happening in that com- 
munity? Tune in for some an- 
swers and an appeal for funds. 
Boston Symphony: Live in 
Concert. Bernstein; Diverti- 
mento for Orchestra; Beetho- 
ven: Piano Concerto No. 3 in 
C minor, op. 37; Bartok; Con- 
certo for Orchestra. Rudolf 
Serkin is the soloist. Seiji 
Ozawa conducts. Stereo. Dolby 
Noise Reduction. Program sub- 
ject to change. Fundraising 
at intermission. 



1 1 :00 Dial 21 3/985-5735. Someone 
will answer your call. Answer 
our call for subscribers. 

11:30 Janus Company Radio Theatre. 
Frankenstein month begins 
with part 1 of Mary Shelley's 
classic novel. 

12:00 am Something's Happening! 
Night environments. Roy of 
Hollywood's choice of things 
to come. 



9 Friday 



6:00 Very Early Sunrise Pitching. 

For early rising non-subscribers. 
7:00 Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone, 
9:00 Fundraising Focus: The News 

Audience is asked to call. 
9:30 This Morning. News and Blase 
Bonpane Commentary. 

10:00 Independent Music. Mario asks 
his listeners to help make KPFK 
independent. 

11:30 The Morning Reading, resf/- 
mony: The l\/temoirs of Dmi- 
tri Shostakovich, as read by 
Gary Kern. 

12:00 Noon Concert: Soundboard. 
Special guest Vicente Gomdz 
joins host John Wager-Schnei- 
der today. Senor Gomez, since 
his arrival in New York in the 
early '40s, has been seen on 
screen (Blood and Sand with 
Rita Hayworth), radio (extend- 
ed broadcasting with NBC), 
and stage. Since the 1950's, 
he has been a pillar in the Los 
Angeles guitar community. He 
will share some of his 30 albums 



recorded for Decca, stories, and 
his new album for students put 
out by the Spanish Music Cen- 
ter of New York. A little bit 
of fundraising, too. 

2:00 The Afternoon Air. Pitching 
at appropriate moments. The 
lineup for today: Portraits of 
the U.S.S.R. —interviews and 
discussion about Soviet society 
and history; at 3:00, tJewswatch 
with Clare Spark and Marc 
Cooper, open phones for your 
analysis of the treatment of the 
news in the media; at 4:30, 
Just a l\/linute: The World This 
tVee/r— discussion of world and 
national events. Terry Hodel 
with the Calendar. 

6:00 The Evening News. 

6:30 New Subscriber Search. 

7:00 The Health Department. News, 
views, and features about sci- 
• ence and health, hosted by 
Al Huebner, who also has a 
few words to say about the 
health of listener-sponsored 
radio. Help us get in shape! 

8:00 Le Jazz Hot & Cool. John 
Breckow will share his ama- 
zing record collection with 
you if some non-subscribers 
subscribe. Take out a gift 
subscription and help us along! 
10:00 Hour 25: Science Fiction. 

Mike Hodel with an appeal. 
12:00 am Straight, No Chaser. Jay 
Green asks for your support. 

2:00 am Listen to this Space. . . 
Will people subscribe at 2 am? 

11111 iii 



Dear Winterf air-goers and Craftspeople, 

The staff of KPFK has decided not to hold a Winter crafts fair 
this year. Thank you for your support and attendance at those 
of years past. 

The decision was based on past experiencLN how ' diainini;" 
the fair can be in terms of staff energies and station monies. 
It, and other events like it, detract from our first priority of 
doing RADIO. 

For those of you \n\\q shopped at the fair for vkfinlcr-time pre- 
sents, why not consider giving a gift subscription to KPFK? 
A subscription form can be found on page 38 of the Folio; 
or. you can call the station and have us bill you. 

Thanks again for your past supp'^n' 



The Suff of KPFK 



OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 20 



10 Saturday 



6:00 Morning of the World. An enti- 
cing blend of music and fund- 
raising. 

7:30 Music of South Asia. Host is 
Harihar Rao. 

8:30 Folk Music. John Davis' audi- 
ence is always a generous one; 
they get their chance to prove 
it once again. 
10:30 Halfway Down the Stairs. Meet 
Uncle Ruthie and KPFK half- 
way by subscribing! 
11:30 From This Point Forward. Bi- 
weekly program of social 
theory and tactics for the 
'80s and beyond. Host Joel 
Gayman interviews guests on 
the nature and process of pro- 
gressive social change from a 
commited, but not partisan, 
perspective. This week: Action 
on the Democratic Left: in- 
terview with Harold Meyerson, 
West Coast Director of the De- 
mocratic Socialist Organizing 
Committee (DSOC). Topics 
include: DSOC's political pro- 
gram and strategy for the '80s, 
its relation to the Democratic 
Party, its planned merger with 
the New American Movement, 
and much more. Audience 
questions and criticisms are 
invited. And new subscriptions 
are solicited. Join our ranks! 
12:25 Weekend Calendar. 
12:35 The Car Show. John Retsek 
and Len Frank give good ad- 
vice about cars, and good ad- 
vice about listener-sponsored 
radio. Where else could a show 
like this exist? 

2:00 Ballads, Banjos, & Bluegrass. 
Tom Sauber pitches, and if 
he gets a good response, might 
even play a tune himself. 

3:00 We Call It Music. Jim Seeley 
with musical nostalgia and 
some fundraising. 

4:00 Jazz Omnibus. Ron Pelletier 
asks the jazz audience to dig 
up a little loose change while 
the music's playing. 

6:00 The Saturday News. 

6:30 Cultural Fundraising. 

7:15 Scoff of Reviewers. Returning 
to KPFK's air, the critics cri- 
ticized. Regular reviewers from 
the Cultural Affairs Department 
respond to the listeners' criti- 
cism. Open phones. Host is Paul 
Vangelisti. 

8:00 William Malloch Programme. 
Our musical treasure hunt this 



week is also a hunt for subscri- 
bers. If you find any, tell them 
to call 985-5735. 

10:00 Imaginary Landscape. Special 
program this evening, with 
fundraising. Carl Stone hosts. 

12:00 am Maximum Rock & Roll. 
Tim Yohannan hosts. 
2:00 am 2 O'Ciock Rock. Besides 
playing obscure underground 
records, A. 'Enthal and Robert 
Francis can now play cassette 
tapes. Local musicians are wel- 
come to submit music to this 
program at Box 4904, Pano- 
rama City, CA 91412 (though 
they should listen to the pro- 
gram once or twice to see if 
what they do fits with what 
is played. No heavy metal or 
cabaret rock is used, for in- 
stance). Musicians and listeners 
are also welcome to subscribe. 



11 Sunday 



6:00 Gospel Caravan. Prince Dixon 

pitches and plays. 
9:00 Bio-Cosmology. Jack Garris 
explores a myriad of contem- 
porary insights: the integration 
of bi-hemispheric consciousness 
and bio-rhythmical body states, 
the complementary concepts 
of a quantum physics of inter- 
penetration, the extra-species 
communication with dolphins 
and primates, the moon per- 
ception of an island earth in a 
cosmic sea of blackness, the pro 
jection of an intergalactic intel- 
ligence network, the theoreti- 
cal presence of black holes spi- 
ralling to elsewhere and else- 
when. The program will pre- 
sent an organic synthesis of the 
micro-sensitivity of science and 
the holistic perception of uni- 
tive consciousness. 

11:00 Dorothy Healey. Marxist com- 
mentary, with comments about 
why listeners should subscribe. 

12:00 Many Worlds of Music. Mario 
Casetta with an enticing blend 
of music and fundraising. 
1 :00 The Sunday Opera. Weill : 

Threepenny Opera. Soloists in- 
clude Lotte Lenya as Jenny, 
with Wolfgang Neuss, Willy 
Trenk-Trebitsch, Trude Hester- 
berg. Orchestra and chorus con- 
ducted by Wilhelm Bruekner- 
Rueggeberg. Columbia 02L 
257. Fred Hyatt hosts, and 
asks for your 3 cents per day. 



6:00 
6:30 



7:00 



5:00 Beyond the Fragments. Carl 
Boggs with analysis and dis- 
cussion of current national 
and international politics. 
Open phones, and some time 
taken out for fundraising. 
The Sunday News. 
The Science Conncetion. Steve 
and Vera Kilston host. Open 
phones. 

Preaching the Blues. Blues, 
black gospel, and boogie woo- 
gie. New releases and/or re- 
issues; new subscribers and/or 
renewals welcomed, too. Mary 
Aldin hosts and tells you why 
it's worthwhile to call 985-5735. 

8:30 Overnight Productions/ IMRU. 
The regular IMRU lesbian/gay 
news report, the community cal- 
endar, and an update on the case 
of John Zeh, producer of "Gay- 
dreams" on Cincinnati's WAIF, 
who is being prosecuted for 
"obscenity." And a pitch for 
funds. 

9:30 Folkscene. Scheduled guests 
this evening are the duo of 
Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan 
with blues and rags. Hosts are 
Howard and Roz Larman. 
12:00 am Smoke Rings. Jazz and con- 
versation all night long with 
John Breckow. 



Who is this KPFK staffer? Does he know 
what he's doing? Is he losing it? 




OCTOBER FOLIO f>AGE 21 



12 Monday 



6:00 Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 
Fundraising somewhere in the 
middle. 
9:00 This Morning's Pitch. No curves, 
no sliders. Just a number; 213/ 
985-5735. 
9:30 This Morning. News and Com- 
mentary from Phyllis Bennis. 
10:00 Folkdance with Mario! and 

fundraise with Mario! 
1 1 :00 The Morning Reading. Con 
tinuing with resf/mo/J/." The 
Metnoirs of Dmitri Shostal<ovich. 
Gary Kern reads. Theme music: 
String Quartet No. 8. 
11:30 Public Affairs Open Time. 
12:00 Noon Concert with Jeannie 
Pool. Focus on contemporary 
women composers, new re- 
leases, recent performances. 
Time out for pitching. 
2:00 Alan Watts. "Solid Emptiness," 
part 4, concluding. Rebroad- 
cast tonight at midnight. 
3:00 The Afternoon Air. News head 
lines with Marc Cooper. A little 
bit of fundraising, then a spe- 
cial rebroadcast of El Salvador: 
It Isn't Really War. What is the 
real human rights situation in 
El Salvador as of Summer 1981? 
A documentary with participa- 
tion by the El Salvador Human 
Rights Commission and the 
Legal Aid Office of the Arch- 
diocese of San Salvador. Pro- 
duced in Honduras and Mex- 
ico by Marc Cooper. A pitch 
for new subscribers; then, Ida 
Honorof with Consumer Aware- 
ness. Terry Hodel with Calendar. 
6:0C The Evening News. 
6:45 Comment: Charles Morgan. 
7:00 Labor Scene. Sam Kushner. 
7:30 New Subscriber Search. 
8:00 Family Tree. Exploration of 
issues and concerns of the 
Black community with host/ 
producer Sylvester Rivers. 
8:30 Time to Fundraise. And raise 

the banner for KPFK! 
9:00 In Recital: Harpsichordist 
Edward Parmentier. Special 
rebroadcast of this live concert 
performed in KPFK's own Stu- 
dio Z in May of this year. Mr. 
Parmentier dazzled the audienci 
with exciting performances on 
a number of different instru- 
ments; in addition, his discus- 
sion of the music and perfor- 
mance practices of the period 
with Joseph Spencer was both 
enlightening and entertaining. 
Don't miss it a second time! 




Special rcbroadiiist ol El Salvador; It Isn't Really War, pan of The Afternoon Air 
Monday, the 12th. 



Fundraising afterward. 
12:00 am Something's Happening! 

Alan Watts speaks on "Solid 
Emptiness," part 4, concluding. 
Fundraising to 1 ;45. Then "The 
Healing Brain" symposium, part 
3 with Meredith Minkler, Dr. 
P.H., assistant professor of 
Health Education, School of 
Public Health, UC Berkeley. 
Her research interests include 
the problems of aging in Ameri- 
can society, the health effects 
of retirement, and the role of 
supportive ties in health main- 
tenance. She has found a maior 
ana often neglected risk factor 
in morbidity and mortality ap- 
pears to be the extent to which 
an individual is enmeshed in 
supportive social networks. Dr. 
Minkler reviews various mech- 
anisms by which societies in- 
fluence health (46 min.). Pro- 
duced by Margaret Fowler. 
2:30-6:00, open programming. 
Roy of Hollywood hosts. 



13 Tuesday 



6:00 



300 



Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 
Fundraising from 8:00. 
This Morning. Short version, 
News and Charles Morgan Com- 
mentary (rebr.). 



9:30 An Appeal for Funds. 

10:00 Folkscene. Today, a program 
of traditional and contempor- 
ary American folk music. Roz 
and Howard Larman host. 

11:00 The Morning Reading. Contin- 
uing with Gary Kern's reading 
of Testimony: The Memoirs of 
Dmitri Shostakovich. 

11:30 Dial the Magic Number and 

you can become a KPFK spon- 
sor, or make a friend one. 

12:00 Noon Concert: At the Key- 
board, with Leonid Hambro. 
Fundraising at the end. 
2:00 The Afternoon Air. At the top: 
Tom Nixon with The Nixon 
Tapes, at 3:00, Sharon Maeda, 
Executive Director of the Paci- 
fica Foundation, hosts a panel 
of colleagues in public media. 
The question: minority access 
in that arena. Carl Stone pro- 
vides musical commentary. 
Pitching punctuates the shock- 
ing history of exclusion and 
retaliation. Terry Hodel with 
Calendar. 
6:00 The Evening News. 
6:45 Open Journal. With fundraising. 
7:30 Prescription for Survival. The 
past several months have been 
witness to the increasing mo- 
mentum of a nationwide call for 
a U.S.-Soviet Union Nuclear 
Arms Freeze. The Freeze pro- 
posal calls for the immediate 
halt, by both nations, of all 
further testing, production. 



OCTOBER FOLn PACE 22 





and deployment of nuclear 




Some fundraising afterward; 




trition, vitamins, and minerals. 




weapons and of systems de- 




at 3:00, news headlines with 




At 3:00, news headlines with 




signed to deliver those wea- 




Marc Cooper. Then, Laurie 




Marc Cooper; then, some re- 




pons. This month of October 




Anderson's performance piece 




cent news and public affairs 




marks the official initiation of 




The United States , as heard on 




specials-ad hoc. At 4:30, 




a statewide campaign to place 




our presentation of the New 




Bed-Time Story: Timothy 




a Nuclear Weapons Freeze Ini- 




Music America Festival '81 \r\ 




Leary and other '60s cult 




tiative on the California ballot 




June. The piece provides the 




figures: a scary essay on put- 




in November of 1982. Please 




focus for a panel discussion on 




ting the miofl to sleep. Pitch- 




join the Los Angeles Physicians 




how cuts in the budoets of 




ing at opportune moments. 




for Social Responsibility on 




NEAand NEH might affect 


6:00 


The Evening News. 




this special program to discuss 




American culture. How would 


6:45 


Noteciero Paclflca. Spanisn 




the Freeze proposal and to 




the private sector fund the arts 




News and fundraising. 




learn how each and every in- 




and humanities? Calendar with 


7:15 


Voz y Raiz de Latino America. 




dividual can assist in bringing 




Terry Hodel. 




Fundraising included. 




an end to the nuclear arms 


6:00 


The Evening News. 


8:00 


Prophets and Other Trouble- 




race. Dr. Bob Rufsvold hosts. 


6:45 


Comment: Charles Morgan. 




makers. News, interviews, and 




With fundraising. 


7:00 


International Journal. News 




phone-ins. Your SDOnsorship 


8:30 


Time to Pitch. 




and features about the latest 




solicited. Call 985-5735. 


9:00 


First Festival of Traditional 




developments in world poli- 


9:00 


Boston Symphony: Live In 




Latin American Music, Los 




tics. 




Concert. Beethoven: Overture 




Angeles. Primer Festival de 


7:30 


Request for Listener Support. 




from the Incidental Music to 




Musica Tradicional Latino- 




Urge your friends to call 985- 




Goethe's Egmont, op. 84; 




Americana. Recorded live in 




5735. 




Antoniou: Circle of Thanatos 




concert at East Los Angeles 


8:00 


Two Composers: Edgard 




and Genesis; Beethoven: Sym- 




College, Ingalls Auditorium 




Varese and Frank Zappa, fea- 




phony No. 5 in E flat, op. 73. 




earlier this year. Performan- 




turing the music of both, and 




Michael Best, tenor; Mac Mor- 




ces by Sukay (Andean music); 




an interview with the latter. 




gan, narrator. Tanglewood Fes- 




Grupo Folklorico Barlovento 




Produced bv Carl Stone. 




tival Chorus. John Oliver con- 




(from Venezuela); and Los 


10:00 


New Subscribers Encouraged. 




ducts. Stereo. Dolby Noise Re- 




Jaraneros (from Mexico). 




Lapsed ones are asked to return 




duction. Program subject to 


10:30 


Fundraising. 




to the fold. 




change. Fundraising at inter- 


11:00 


Music of South Asia. Host is 


10:30 


The Big Broadcast. Country 




mission. 




Harihar Rao. 




music month, featuring Gene 


11:00 


Fundraising. 


12:0C 


am Centerstand. Motorcycle 




Autry and the National Barn 


11:30 


Janus Company Radio Theatre 




news, talk, information, and 




Dance. Bobb Lynes hosts. 




Frankenstein: The Creature's 




open phones with Richard 




Fundraising included. 




Story, part 2. Mallory and Jan 




Hill, Roy Tuckman and ex- 


12:00 


am Something's Happening! 




Geller's retelling of the fa- 




pert guests from the world 




Fundraising at the beginning; 




mous story. 




of motorcycling. Fundraising 




night environments til 6 (spo- 


12:00 


am Something's Happening! 




prodding throughout. 




ken arts, mostly). Roy of 




Open to 2. From 2-6 am, Jim 


1:30 


Something's Happening! Night 
environments to 4. Then, Jack 
Gariss with Bio-Cosmology to 6. 




Hollywood hosts. 




Morrison: Artist in Hell , prize- 
winning documentary pro- 
duced by Clare Spark on (and 
with) music, philosophy. 




















friends, and life of the Doors' 










15 Thursday 




lead singer. 


14 


Wednesday 


6:00 


Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 










6:00 


Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 




Appeal to potential subscri- 
bers along with the music. 


16 FriHav 


9:00 


This Morning's Pitch. An appeal 
to non-subscribing listeners. 


9:00 


This Morning. News and Charles 
Morgan Commentary (rebr.). 


^L.^r 




10:00 


This Morning. Later edition; 


9:30 


Time to Fundraise. 


6:00 


Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 




news, commentary. Read All 


10:30 


Folkscene. Bluegrass, country. 


9:00 


Fundraising Hour. 




About It, Terry Hodel with 




and original songs performed 


10:00 


This Morning. Short version. 




Calendar. 




by Byron Berline and the New 




with news and Blase Bonpane 


11:00 


Public Affairs Time, with fund- 




Sundance Band. Howard and 




commentary. 




raising included. 




Roz Larman host. 


10:30 


Independent Music. Mario 


12:00 


Noontime Reading. Gary Kern 


11:30 


Public Affairs Pitch. 




Casetta pitches and plays. 




with Testimony: The Memoirs 


12:30 


Noon Concert: Chapel, Court, 


11:30 


The Morning Reading. Testi- 




of Dmitri Shostakovich. 




and Countryside. Early music 




mony: The Memoirs of Dmi- 


12:30 


Noontime Pitch. 




from the medieval to the ba- 




tri Shostakovich. Reader is 


1:00 


Noon (Afternoon) Concert. 




roque. Joseph Spencer hosts. 




Gary Kern. 


2:00 


The Afternoon Air. Ramona 


2:00 


The Afternoon Air. Today, an 


12:00 


Noon Concert: Soundboard. 




Ripston's segment of our Re- 




early time for The Wizards: Dr. 




The guitar music of world-fa- 




productive Rights Teach-in: 




Irv Lyon, biochemist and can- 




mous living composer Toru 




focussing on legislation threat- 




cer researcher at Wadsworth 




Takemitsu is featured today. 




ening women's civil rights. 




VA Hospital, talks about nu- 




The talented Japanese com- 



OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 23 



poser has used guitar and lute 
in much chamber music, and 
we will be sampling his Novem- 
ber Steps (concerto for biwa 
and shakuhachi); Valeria; Ring; 
Music of Tree, and his little- 
known 12 Songs for Guitar- 
pop tunes arranged for solo 
guitar. Tune in for this rare 
treat. John Wager-Schneider 
hosts. Fundraising wedged in. 

2:00 The Afternoon Air. Today, 

recent news and public affairs 
specials, with pitching here 
and there. At 4: 1 5, £/ Salva- 
dor Refugees: The Stain that 
Won't Go Away. A look at 
the 25,000 refugees from El 
Salvador living in Honduras. 
Recorded in the refugee camps 
along the border, you will hear 
eyewitness testamony of how 
innocent Salvadorean peasants 
are caught in the repression of 
their country's military forces. 
You'll also hear how the Hon- 
duran army has participated 
in massacres of peasants cros- 
sing into their country. Pro- 
duced by Marc Cooper. Cal- 
endar with Tarry Model. 

6:00 The Evening News. 

6:30 To Give Is Better. . . 

7:00 The Health Department. Al 
Huebner with news, views, 
and features about science 
and health. And some fund- 
raising along the way. 

8:00 Le Jazz Hot & Cool. Pitch 

and play with John Breckow. 



10:00 Hour 25: Science Fiction. 

KPFK needs to survive in the 
present if it is to survive in 
the future. 985-5735. 
am Straight, No Chaser. Jay 
Green with music and pitching. 
am Listen to this Space. . . 
You'll hear a phone number. . . 



12:00 



2:00 



17 Saturday 



6:00 Morning of the World. Music 
from around the world. 

7:30 Early Morning Fundraising. 

8:30 Folk Music. John Davis plays 
some and pitches some. And 
gets some extra time, too. 
1 1 :30 Halfway Down the Stairs. 

Uncle Ruthie with her special 
brand of fun for kids. 
12:25 Weekend Calendar. 
12:35 The Car Show. John Retsek 
and Len Frank with advice 
on how to keep your car in 
good shape, and how to keep 
your station in good shape, 
too. Call 985-5735. 

2:30 Ballads, Banjos, & Bluegrass. 
Short version this week. Tom 
Sauber hosts. 

3:00 We Call It Music. Jim Seeley 
hosts. 

3:30 Jazz Omnibus. Long version, 
in which Ron Pelletier plays 
a lot of music and also makes 



an appeal to the jazz audience. 
6:00 The Saturday Pitch. Just a V2 

hour. 
6:30 The Saturday News. 
7:00 The American Mercury. A 
journal of popular culture, 
examining H.L. Mencken's 
dictum, "Nobody ever went 
broke underestimating the 
taste or intelligence of the 
American public." Produced 
and hosted by Mike Hodel. 
A bit of fundraising at the end. 
8:00 William Malloch Programme. 
A musical (mostly classical) 
treasure hunt conducted by 
critic, composer, and member 
of the Music Panel of the Cal- 
ifornia Arts Council. Pitching 
at the beginning. 

10:00 Imaginary Landscape. Special 
program tonight, with some 
fundraising. Support the 
avant-garde on KPFK! 

12:00 am Maximum Rock & Roll. 
Tim Yohannan and sfjecial 
guests host. Rare stuff. 
2:00 am 2 O'Clock Rock. The rock 
played here isn't Chuck Berry's 
as the program title might im- 
ply, and it isn't REO Speed- 
wagon, the Police, or the GoGos. 
David Thomas & The Pedestri- 
ans, lllya A Volkswagens, Pos- 
itive Noise, The Unusual Sus- 
pects, and Typical Girls might 
be heard, though. Requests wel- 
come at 985-5735. A. 'Enthal 
and Robert Francis host. 



^'^-^.^ 




OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 24 



18 Sunday 



In celebration of Black music, today 
we present an all-day exploration of 
the music of Black people from 
Mother Africa to the Caribbean and 
on to Black America. 

6:00 Gospel Caravan. Prince Dixon, 
as always. 

9:00 Opening to Africa: Instruments 
that Originated in Africa. An ex- 
ploration of the African influ- 
ence on Black music throughout 
the years, and its influence on 
Europen music. 
10:30 Caribbean and Island Music. 
Calypso, slave trade, and revo- 
lutionary music. Reggae and 
rastas explain that concept of 
life in relation to the music. 
12:00 Noon Concert. Featuring con- 
certs recorded live in our own 
Studio Z. 

2:00 Music: 1900-1955. An histori- 
cal look at gospel music, sing- 
ing in the fields, blues, and Dix- 
ieland; special look at bebop 
swing and the Big Band era. 
We'll also'focjs on female vo- 
calists and instrumentalists 
1900-1955. 

4:00 The History of Rock & Roll. 
How strong was the influence 



Paul Robeson 




19 Monday 




6:00 
9:00 



10:00 
11:00 



11:30 
12:00 



2:00 



Biltie Holiday 



jf Black music on Rock & 
Roll, and what were Its off- 
shoots? 

5:00 All That Jazz. Concentrating 
on the music of John Coltrane, 
Eric Dolphy, Charlie Mingus, 
and more. Discussion of the 
music of the Art Ensemble of 
' Chicago, Mai Waidron, and 
others who left the United 
States to play their music due 
to lack of enthusiasm of Am- 
erican audiences. 

7:30 Panel of L.A. Musicians. Dis 
cussion about the music and 
its evolution over the years; 
how musicians were affected 
by different socio-economic 
factors, for example, the De- 
pression and racism; and prob- 
lems faced by musicians in re- 
gards to their music— commer- 
cialism, purity, and the need 
to survive. 

8:30 Live from Studio Z. Details 
unavailable at press time. Stay 
tuned to KPFK for more in- 
formation on specific perform- 
ers. 

10:00 Potpourri. A melange of At 

rican, reggae, top 40, jazz, f'jnk, 
and anything else that fits Into 
the realm of Black music, 

12:00 am Smoke Rings. John Breckow 
with jazz. 



3:00 



Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 
This Morning. News, Phyllis 
Bennis Commentary, Read 
All About It, Calendar with 
Terry Model. 
Folkdance with Mario! 
The Morning Reading. Tesf/- 
mony: The Memoirs of Dmitri 
Shostakovich. Theme music: 
String Quartet No. 8. Reader 
is Gary Kern. 
Public Affairs Open Time. 
Noon Concert with Jeannie 
Pool Works by contemporary 
women composers,new relea- 
ses, taped performances, 
Alan Watts. "Reality, Art, 
and Illusion," part 1 or 4, A 
discussion of the Indian philo- 
sophy of the world as "maya" 
—under its several meanings ' 
as illusion, art, magic, creative 
power, measure, etc. Various 
techniques in the arts are used 
to illustrate the diaphanous and 
vibrational character of the ma- 
terial world, and to suggest a 
new approach to the old phil- 
osophy that the universe is 
"mind" only. (50'). Rebroad- 
cast at midnight. 
The Afternoon Air. News head- 
lines with Marc Cooper; at 3:30, 
Organic Gardening with Will 
Kinney and Barbara Spark; at 
4:30, Dealing with Barbara Cady 




OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 25 



6:00 
6:45 
7:00 
7:30 

8:30 



9:00 



10:30 



11:30 
12:00 



Gary Rjchwald with Body Poli- 
tics. Terry Model with Calendar. 
The Evening News. 
Comment: Charles Morgan. 
Labor Scene. Sam Kushner. 
Open Journal. Late-breaking 
news features and discussions. 
Family Tree. Exploration of 
issues and concerns of the 
Black community. Host/pro- 
ducer is Sylvester Rivers. 
Chapel Court, and Countryside. 
Host Joseph Spencer shares his 
expertise on early music, its 
instruments, and performance 
practices. 

In Fidelity. One-brand "rack" 
systems, digital recording, in- 
terfaces with video. . .Will these 
kill component audio as we've 
known it these 20 years? Will 
it revert entirely to the esoteric- 
hobby status it had in the '50s, 
before mass-marketing blew it 
out of the water? Stimulating 
converstation on this and rela- 
ted topics with Peter Sutheim, 
host, and guests. Open phones 
The Late Niqht News, 
am Something's Happening! 
Alan Watts speaks on "Reality, 
Art, and Illusion," part 1 of 4 
(50 min.). See 2 pm listings for 
details. At 1 am, "The Healing 
Brain" symposium, part 4 with 
Robert E. Ornstein, Ph.D., asso- 
ciate professor of medical psy- 
chology, University of Califor- 
nia, San Francisco, and presi- 
dent of the Institute for the 
Study of Human Knowledge. 
He Is the author of "The Psy- 
chology of Consciousness" and 
"The Mind Field" and the co- 
author of "On the Psychology 



of Being." He states recent re- 
search indicates that the brain 
is much more plastic than pre- 
viously thought. The brain 
changes its organiijation to meet 
different situations. He discus- 
ses the implication of such brain 
changes on health (ca. 45 min.). 
1:45-6 am, open programming. 
Roy of Hollywood hosts. 



20 Tuesday 



6:00 
9:00 



10:00 



11:00 



11:30 
12:00 

2:00 



6:00 
6:45 



Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 
This Morning. News, Charles 
Morgan Commentary (rebr.). 
Read All About It, Calendar 
with Terry Hodel. 
Folkscene. Today, a program 
of traditional and contempor- 
ary American music. Howard 
and Roz Larman host. 
The Morning Reading. Gary 
Kern reads from Testimony: 
The l\/lemoirs of Dmitri Shos- 
tal<ovicti. Music: String Quartet 
No. 8. 

Public Affairs Open Time. . 
Noon Concert: At the Key- • 
board, with Leonid Hambro. 
The Afternoon Air. Open time 
til 3:00 and. news headlines with 
Marc Cooper; at 3:30, American 
Indian Airwaves with Liz Lloyd; 
then, Tom Nixon with The Nix- 
on Tapes; at 5:00, Cary Lowe's 
Newsweek. Terry Hodel with 
Calendar. 

The Evening News. 
Open Journal. 



KPFK PLANS TOUR OF CUBA 

(Pending outcome of air traffic controllers' strike) 

As part of KPFK's efforts to gather the news and information which 
we all depend upon, we continue our study program. 

Our trip to Poland was ready to go until the air traffic controllers 
went on strike — we hope to reconstitute it for the Spring of next 
year. In the meantime, we are planning to travel to Cuba via Mexico 
December 18 to January 2. This trip will cost in the neighborhood 
of SI, 500 for all expenses, including air transportation, meals, and 
hotels. This trip, like our previous effort in Nicaragua, will meet with 
leaders of government, labor, education, popular organizations, factory 
workers, etc., and tape all of the conversations and meetings for future 
broadcast on KPFK. Join in this valuable and exciting contribution to 
KPFK's information programming, and see first hand the problems and 
accomplishments of Cuban society. 

For reservatloni and information call tour coordinator Bill Bidner at 
8393782. 



7:30 



8:30 
10:30 

11:30 
12:00 



1:30 



Help Is on the Way. A critical 

analysis of the mental health 

profession. Clinical psychologist 

Steve Portuges hosts, with open 

phones. 

Tuesday Evening Concert. 

Music of South Asia. Host is 

Harihar Rao. 

The Late Night News. 

am Centerstand. Motorcycle 

maniacs gather and talk. Twice 

as good as The Car Show, with 

only half the wheels and % the 

gas. 

am Something's Happening! 

Night environment til 4. Jack 

Gariss with Bio-Cosmology to 

6. Roy of Hollywood hosts. 



21 Wednesday 



6:00 
9:00 



10:00 
11:00 



11:30 
12:00 



2:00 



6:00 
6:45 
7:00 



7:30 
9:00 



Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 
This Morning. News, Commen- 
tary, Read All About It, Terry 
Hodel with Calendar. 
Folkdance with Mario! 
The Morning Reading. We con- 
tinue with Testimony: The 
Memoirs of Dmitri Shostakovich, 
as read by Gary Kern. 
Public Affairs Open Time. 
Noon Concert: William Malloch 
Programme. A musical (mostly 
classical) treasure hunt conduct- 
ed by critic, composer, and mem- 
ber of the Music Panel of the 
California Arts Council. 
The Afternoon Air. Theater 
Close-Up wi'h Ray Tatar; open 
time til 3:00 and news headlines 
with Marc Cooper; at 3:30, Fem- 
inist Magazine with Helene Ro- 
senbluth, featuring news, inter- 
views, music; Terry Hodel with 
Calendar. 

The Evening News. 
Comment: Charles Morgan. 
International Journal. News and 
features about the latest devel- 
opments in world politics. 
Up From the Ash Grove. Ed 
Pearl hosts. 

New York Capitol of the 20th 
Century: A lecture by Elizabeth 
Hai-dwick (par* 2). In this sec- 
ond of a two-part essay, "De- 
molitions," novelist and critic 
Hardwick discusses the con- 
temporary "Manhattan ism" 
of a life totally fabricated by 
man— a culture of instability— 
in which the ideal of consump- 
tion unites, tragically, the rich 
and the poor. Delivered as the 
UCLA English Department's 



OCTOBLR I OLIO PAGF 7fi 





annual Ewing Lecture, it was 


9:00 


Boston Symphony: Live in 






recorded April 22, 1981 and 




Concert. Beethoven: Symphony 






produced for KPFK by Paul 




No. 2; Bartok : Concerto for 






Vanqelisti. 




Orchestra. Seiji Ozawa con- 




10:00 The Big Broadcast. Country 




ducts. Stereo. Dolby Noise 






music month, featuring Roy 




Reduction. Program subject to 






Rogers and the Sons of the 




change. 






Pioneers. Bobb Lynes hosts. 


11:00 


Janus Company Radio Theater. 




11:30 The Late Niqht News. 




In part 3 of Frankenstein, the 


'cause when love is gone, 


12:00 


am Something's Happening! 




creature forces Frankenstein to 




Night environments. Roy of 




create a woman for him. 






Hollywood hosts. 


11:30 
12:00 


The Late Night News. 

am Something's Happening! 

Night environments with host 
Roy of Hollywood. 


there's always justice; 
and when justice is gone. 






22 Thursday 






there's always force; 







6:00 


Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 


23 Friday 


and when force is gone, 


9:00 


This Morning. News, Charles 
Morgan Commentary (rebr.l. 






there's always 




Read All About It, Calendar 


6:00 


Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 


Mom. 




with Terry Hodel. 


9:00 


This Morning. News, Blase 


10:00 


Folkdance with Mario! 




Bonpane Commentary, fea- 




11:00 


The Morning Reading. Gary 




tures. Calendar with Terry 






Kern continues his reading of 




Hodel. 


Laurie Anderson 




Testimony: The Memoirs of 


10:00 


Independent Music. With 


Superman 




Dmitri Shosta/<ovich. 




Mario Casetta. 




11:30 


Public Affairs Open Time. 


11:00 


The Morning Reading. Contin- 




12:00 


Noon Concert: Chapel, Court, 
and Countryside. Today, host 
Joseph Spencer features Affiti 
Musicale, a virtuoso ensemble 
from San Francisco that speciali- 




uing with Testimony— The 
Memoirs of Dmitri Shostako- 
vich. Reader is Gary Kern. 
Theme music: String Quartet 
No. 8. 






zes In Italian chamber music of 


11:30 


Public Affairs Open Time. 






the 17th century. Leader Michael 


12:00 


Noon Concert: Soundboard. 






Collver plays the cornetto, a 




Today's program features new 






small wooden trumpet; Robin 
Howell plays dulcian, the an- 




releases, including Pepe Rome- 




ro's new Music of Rodrigo on 






cestor of the bassoon; and Eileen 




Philips, and much, much more. 






Anderson Is their harpsichordist. 




John Wager-Schneider hosts. 


The same fears were shared by 


2:00 


The Afternoon Air. Paul Lion 


2:00 


The Afternoon Air. Portraits 


those concerned about occupa- 




with Media Rare; at 2:30, Grace 




of the U.S.S.R.-nev/ series with 


tional safety and health. What 




Jacobs with Speaking of Seniors; 




interviews, panel discussion. 


has the Administration done 




Marc Cooper with news headlines 




and commentaries with people 


during its first nine months m 




at 3:00, followed by Bob Pugs- 




of varying orientations to So 


office? Tonight a summary on 




ley with Inside L.A.Ax 4:00, 




viet history and society. At 3, 


the state of environmental health. 




Nawana Davis with Music Black 




Newswatch with Marc Cooper 


Produced by Al Huebner. 




and White, and at 5:00, The 




and Clare Spark, who await 8:C 


10 Le Jazz Hot & Cool. John 




Wizards on "Russian Nuclear 




your analyses of the news and 


Breckow shares his incredible 




Accident" with guest Myron 




reportage. Followed b^ Just a 


record collection with you. 




Wollin. Terry Hodel with the 




Minute: The World This Week: 10:( 


K) Hour 25: Science Fiction. 




Calendar. 




discussion of world politics and 


Mike Hodel and guests. 


6:00 


The Evening News. 




culture; then. The Iron Triangle, 12:( 


)0 am Straight, No Chaser. Jay 


6:45 


Noticiero Pacifica. Teinta mi- 




a weekly phone call from Gor- 


Green hosts. 




nutos de los acontecemientos 




don Adams about the links be- 2:( 


K) am Listen to this Space. . . 




mas importantes de la semana. 




tween the military industry. 




7:15 


Voz y Raiz de Latino America. 

Revista radial de actualidad po- 




Congress, and the Pentagon. 
Terry Hodel with Calendar. 


■■PP^HH 






litica y cultural de y para la 


6:00 


The Evening Newt. 


^^^^r^ .^^^^^^^M^l 






comunidad Latinoamericana 


6:30 


Open Journal. 


^^^r .^^^HP^i^^R^I 






residente en el sur de California. 


7:00 


The Health Department. When 


^^m ^^^^^JS'A' ^H^l 




8:00 


Prophets and Other Trouble- 




the Reagan Administration 


^v ^^HR^'ff^l 






makers. Is there more to the 




took office, environmentalists 


^H ^^^^^^^^'^j^^l 






religious community than the 




were concerned that progress 


^H ^^^Vv^P^jn^^^l 






Moral Majority? Tune in and 




accomplished in previous years 


^^^^^^^^^^n^^^^H 






find out. Produced by Ecu- 




would be gutted and further 


^^^^^BbMI^BS^^^I 






media. 




progress stopped completely. 


^■iii^'Mi 





nrrnRFR fdi in PAGE ?: 



24 Saturday 



6:00 



7:30 

8:30 
10:30 



11:30 



12:25 
12:35 



2:00 

3:00 
4:00 



6:00 
6:30 
6:45 
7:00 



Morning of the World. Recorded 
live in concert: Primer Festival 
de Musica Tradicional Latinoam- 
ericana-Los Angeles. First con- 
cert features Sukay (Andean), 
Grupo Folklorico Barlovento, 
(Venezuela), and Los Jaraneros 
(Mexico). Recorded April 10, 
1981, East L.A. College, Ingalls 
Auditorium. 

Music of South Asia. Host is 
Harihar Rao. 
Folk Music. John Davis. 
Halfway Down the Stairs. The 
message of Uncle Ruthie's Radio 
Ministry is so subtle that before 
the kids and their folks know it, 
they have turned into the Won- 
derful Human Beings they al- 
ways were! 

From This Point Forward. 
Bi-weekly program of social 
theory and tactics for the '80s 
and beyond. Host Joel Gayman 
interviews guests on the nature 
and process of progressive social 
change from a committed, but 
but not partisan, perspective. 
This week: Hurrah— We Won.... 
Now What? A coalition of 
housing activists, progressive 
community organizations and 
people affiliated with the Cam- 
paign for Economic Democracy 
have taken power in Santa Mo- 
nica. Now the questions are: 
can that electoral power be pre- 
served, and how should it be 
used? Interview with Santa Mo- 
nica Mayor Ruth Yanatta Gold- 
way and her husband, author, 
economist, political strategist 
Derek Shearer. Audience ques- 
tions and criticisms are invited. 
Weekend Calendar. 
The Car Show. John Retsek 
and Len Frank share their ex- 
pertise with you. Open phones. 
Ballads, Banjos & Bluegrass. 
Host is Tom Sauber. 
We Call It Music. Jim Seeley. 
Jazz Omnibus. Ron Pelletier, 
an occasional guest, and always 
fine music. 
The Saturday News. 
On Film: Dean Cohen. 
Onstage: Lawrence Christon. 
The Poetry Connexion! After 
a three-year absence, KPFK's 
pioneering poetry program re- 
turns to the air. On a monthly 
basis, poets will be invited to 
read and discuss their work live 
from KPFK's studios. Tonight, 
Irxlian activist poet Lois Red Elk 



8:00 William Malloch Programme. 

A musical (mostly classical) 
treasure hunt conducted by 
critic, composer, and a mem- 
ber of the Music Panel of the 
California Arts Council. 

10:00 Imaginary Landscape. Tonight 
host Carl Stone features the 
music of Luc Ferrari. 

12:00 am Maximum Rock & Roll. 
Host Tim Yohannan with spe- 
cial guest hosts, obscure records, 
international releases, small 
labels. 
2:00 am 2 O'Clock Rock. A. 'Enthal 
and Robert Francis play under- 
ground rock. 



25 Sunday 



6:00 Gospel Caravan. Prince Dixon. 
9:00 Bio-Cosmology. Jack Gariss. 

11:00 Dorothy Healey. Marxist com- 
mentary, guests, open phones. 

12:00 Many Worlds of Music. Italian 
Avant Garde. "L'Orchestra" is 
one of the hottest labels in West- 
ern Europe. A cooperative re- 
cording venture, it features 
groups from Italy, Germany, 
France, Holland, etc., many of 
whom represent complete anti- 
establishment attitudes. Today 
Mario Casetta explores their 
latest release from Milano— a 
curious mixture of the Renais- 
sance and the year 20001 



1:00 Tenor of the Times. It has been 
three years to the month since 
Fred Hyatt first extolled the 
virtues of the fine Kammer- 
saenger of the past. Max Hirzel. 
If you did not hear this excel- 
lent voice in 1978, your rain- 
check renews today. 

1:30 The Sunday Opera. Cilea: 
Adrians Lecouvreur. Renata 
Scotto sings the title role; with 
Elena Obraztsova, Placido Do- 
mingo, Sherrill Milnes. James 
Levine conducts the Philharmo- 
nia Orchestra and Ambrosian 
Opera Chorus. Columbia M3 
34588. Fred Hyatt hosts. 

5:00 Beyond the Fragments. Social 
theorist and author Carl 3oggs 
with analysis of current poli- 
tical developments national and 
international. Guests, open 
phones. 

6:00 The Sunday News. 

6:30 The Science Connection. Steve 
and Vera Kilston host. Open 
phones for your input. 

7:00 Preaching the Blues. Blues, 

black gospel, and boogie woo- 
gie. The first half hour is for 
new releases, if any; then, the 
recordings of Piano Red, Dr. 
Ross, Speckled Red, Sonny 
Terry, and Ethel Waters. The 
blues calendar at 8, plus what- 
ever else. Mary Aldin hosts. 

8:30 Overnight Productions/IMRU. 
Along with the regular IMRU 
Lesbian/Gay news report, and 
the community calendar, An- 
thony Price, Josy Catoggio, 
Art Aratin and David Fradkin 



THE POETRY CONNEXION! 
Premieres October 24, 7:00 pm 

A new live show featuring readings by and interviews with the 
best poets around. We combine informality and spontaneity 
with high quality poetry and political awareness. Look for 
special shows on particular themes: protest poetry, ethnic and 
Third World poetry, prison poetry, poetry and madness, ex- 
perimental poetry, the art of translation, the L.A. poetry scene 
and much more. 

The Poetry Connexion' is hosted by poets Wanda Coleman 
and Austin Straus. 

Wanda Coleman is the author of Mad Dog Black Lady (Black 
Sparrow); she's had over 200 publications in magazines such 
as Partisan Review, Bachy, etc. Also a playwright, short story 
writer and scriptwriter, Wanda won an Emmy for her work on 
a daytime soap. 

Austin Straus has published poems in numerous magazines, ran 
the L.A. Library Poetry Series, has been a regional coordinator 
for Amnesty International, is also a painter and playwright. 



OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 28 



examine the problem of alco- 
holism in the lesbian/gay com- 
munity. Open phones. 
9:30 Folkscene. Scheduled guest is 
singer-songwriter actress Joanna 
Cazden, whose songs range from 
feminist to political to satirical. 
Howard and Roz Larman host. 
12:00 am Smoke Rings. John Breckow 
and jazz. 



26 Monday 



6:00 
9:00 



10:00 
11:00 



11:30 
12:00 



2:00 



3:00 



6:00 
6:45 
7:00 
7:30 

8:30 



9:00 



10:30 



Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 
This Morning. News, Phyllis 
Bennis Commentary, Read 
All About It, Calendar with 
Terry Model. 
Folkdance with Mario! 
The Morning Reading. Con- 
tinuing with Gary Kern's read- 
ing of Testimony: The Mem- 
oirs of Dmitri Shostakovich. 
Public Affairs Open Time. 
Noon Concert with Jeannle 
Pool. Focus on works by con- 
temporary women composers 
featuring new releases and tapes 
of recent live performances. 
Alan Watte. "Reality, Art, and 
Illusion," part 2 of 4 (47 min.). 
Rebroadcast at midnight. (See 
Monday 19th listing for details.) 
The Afternoon Air. News head- 
lines with Marc Cooper; at 3:30, 
Organic Gardening with Will Kin- 
ney and Barbara Spark, open 
phones; at 4:30, Barbara Cady's 
Dealing; then, Ida Honorof with 
Consumer Awareness; finally, 
Terry Model with Calendar. 
The Evening News. 
Comment: Charles Morgan. 
Labor Scene. Sam Kushner. 
Open Journal. Late-breaking 
news features and discussion. 
Family Tree. A weekly explora- 
tion of the issues and concerns 
of the Black community. Syl- 
vester Rivers hosts. 
Chapel, Court, and Countryside. 
Joseph Spencer with KPFK's 
original showcase for early mu- 
sic strives continually to bring 
you the most unusual, the 
most interesting, and the most 
beautiful performances of mu- 
sic before 1800. 
In Fidelity. If you do any seri- 
ous live recording, you ought 
to spend as much on a pair of 
microphones as you spend on 
the recorder. This and other 
provocative thoughts about ama- 
teur recording from host Peter 



Sutheim and a guest or two. 

Open phones. 
11:30 The Late Night News. 
12:00 am Something's Happening! 

Alan Watts speaks on "Reality, 
Art, and Illusion" from MEA, 
Box 303, Sausalito, CA 94965 
(47 min.). At 2:00, "The Meal- 
ing Brain" symposium, part 5, 
with Philip A. Berger, MD, asso- 
ciate professor of psychiatry at 
Stanford. Mis main research has 
been in the role of endorphins 
and mental health, expecially the 
relationship to schizophrenia. En- 
dorphins are natural brain chemi- 
cals that have pharmacological 
properties that are nearly Identi- 
cal to opiates, such as morphine 
or heroin. They may have a 
role in schizophrenia and de- 
pression. As there is both an 
excess and a deficiency of en- 
dorphin activity in patients 
with mental disorders, the nar- 
cotic antagonist naloxone is 
also under study. Produced by 
Margaret Fowler. (62 min.) 
Open programming til 6:00. 
Roy of Hollywood hosts. 



27 Tuesday 



6:00 Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 

9:00 This Morning. News, Charles 
Morgan Commentary (rebr.). 
Read All About It, Calendar 



10:00 Folkscene. Today featuring 
traditional and contemporary 
American folk music. Howard 
and Roz Larman host. 

11:00 The Morning Reading, resf/- 
mony: The Memoirs of Dmi- 
tri Shostakovich. Gary Kern 
is your reader. 

11:30 Public Affairs Open Time. 

12:00 Noon Concert: At the Key- 
board, with Leonid Hambro. 
2:00 The Afternoon Air. Open time 
til 3:00 and news headlines 
with Marc Cooper; open time 
til 4:00 when Tom Nixon shares 
his musical eclectica with you 
on The Nixon Tapes; at 5:00, 
Cary Lowe's Newsweek: report 
on local and state politics. Just 



On tfujaSx 

emotionaC stress ? 

'you 'maij 6e eCiniSd undJir 
Cadp^nua C(wSr word's 
coMjxnsaticn benefits at 
nc cast ti> you. 

Ca([ 27j-7gqo 
jbrjree aj;JsointmeH;& 



What exactly does 

earworks 

do? 

Earworks designs and installs 
musically satisfying home audio 
systems, or counsels you in your 
own equipment purchase. A 
housecall diagnosis and repair 
service is also available. 




Discount stores are not good places 
to go for advice. Market pressures 
force them to recommend components 
for reasons that have nothing to do 
with how well they reproduce music. 
Earworks' principal stock-in-trade is 
information and know-how, wedded 
to a reliable sense of how real, live 
music sounds. Earworks isn't beholden 
to any manufacturer. We can't offer 
you discounts, but we can guide you 
toward the most musical system in 
your price range. If you wish, your 
system will be set up and voiced by a 
thoroughly experienced audio 
professional. 

Please call for more information. 



Peter Sutheim 's I 

earworks 

PRIVATE AUDIO PRACTICE 
(213)255-2425 



OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 29 



before the news. Calendar with 
Terry Model. 
6:00 The Evening News. 
6:45 Open Journal. 
7:30 Prescription for Survival. From 
1945 to 1962, more than 
250,000 American servicemen 
served as guinea pigs to the U.S.'s 
atomic bomb testing program. 
Unknowingly, these soldiers, 
sailors, and marines, these air- 
men, pilots, and others tramped 
through the radioactive dust and 
debris, were enveloped by clouds 
of radioactive fallout, and were 
ordered to clean up the atomic 
garbage. From Hiroshima to 
Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Is- 
lands to the Nevada desert, these 
servicemen became the Atomic 
Veterans. Many of them were 
doomed by their experience to 
death and/or years of lingering 
illness. Join the Los Angeles 
Physicians for Social Responsi- 
bility as we focus on these oft 
unrecognized medical conse- 
quences of nuclear weapons. 
Dr. Bob Rufsvold hosts. Sev- 
eral vets from the National 
Association of Atomic Vet- 
erans will join us. 
8:30 Tuesday Evening Concert. 

10:30 Music of South Asia. Host is 
Harihar Rao. 

1 1 :30 The Late Night News. 

12:00 am Centerstand. Richard Hill 
and Roy Tuckman gather with 
expert guests to discuss the 
wonderful world of motor- 
cycles. Open phones. 
1:30 am Something's Happening! 
Special Jewish night until 4, 
"On Venus, Have We Got a 
Rabbi," by William Tenn, read 
by Mike Hodel (57 min.). Jew- 
ish environments until 4 when 
Bio-Cosmology is rebroadcast 
from last Sunday with Jack 
Gariss. Happy New Year! 



28 Wednesday 

6:00 Sunrise Concert. Carl btone. 
9:00 This Morning. News, Commen 
tary. Read All About It, Terry 
Hodel with Calendar. 
10:00 Folkdance with Mario! 
11:00 The Morning Reading. 7esf/- 
mony: The Memoirs of Dmi- 
tri Shostakovich . Reader is 
Gary Kern. 
11:30 Public Affairs Open Time. 
12:00 Noon Concert: The William 

Malloch Programme. 
2:00 The Afternoon Air. Theater 



6:00 
6:45 
7:00 
7:30 
9:00 



10:45 



11:30 
12:00 



2:00 



Close-Up with Ray Tatar; 
open time til 3:00 and news 
headlines with Marc Cooper; 
Then, Feminist Magazine, fea- 
turing news, interviews, music, 
produced by Helene Rosen- 
bluth. Calendar with Terry 
Hodel. 

The Evening News. 
Comment: Charles Morgan. 
International Journal. 
Up From the Ash Grove. 
Los Angeles Theater of the Ear 
presents Henry /I/ by Luigi 
Pirandello. Featuring William 
Wintersole, W. Dennis Hunt, 
Elizabeth Shepherd, J.S. Young, 
John Medici, Diane Sommerfield, 
Andy Parks, Joseph Clark, Nich- 
olas Lewis, Ron Thompson, in 
a new translation and radio ad- 
aptation by Paul Vangelistl. Ori- 
ginally performed and aired live 
from KPFK's Studio Z, Febru- 
ary 25, 1981. Directed by Van- 
gelisti; engineered by Ed Ham- 
mond. 

The Brg Broadcast. Country 
music month. Surprise special 
of the month! Bobb Lynes hosts. 
The Late Night News, 
am Openphiles. Margaret Fow- 
ler and Eddy La Folle [ci-devant] 
delve deeply into subjects not 
usually delved deeply into. To- 
night, friendship. Open phones. 
am Something's Happening! 
"The Blood Jet Is Poetry: The 
Life and Work of Sylvia Plath," 
by special request, a Pacif ica 
classic (2 hours, 5 min.). Open 
programming til 6. Roy of 
Hollywood hosts. 



29 Thursday 



6:00 Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 

9:00 This Morning. News, Charles 
Morgan Commentary (rebr.). 
Read All About It, Calendar 
with Terry Hodel. 

10:00 Folkscene. The trio of Walt 

Michaels, Tom and Billy Voyer 
perform traditional and contem- 
porary music on the hammered 
dulcimer, fiddle, bass, and gui- 
tar. Howard and Roz Larman 
host. 

11:00 The Morning Reading. Gary . 
Kern with Testimony -The 
Memoirs of Dmitri Shostako- 
vich. 
11:30 Public Affairs Open Time. 

12:00 Noon Concert: Chapel, Court, 
and Countryside. Today, a 
special live presentation by the 



Elizabethan Trio from San 
Francisco: Rella Lossy, ac- 
tress; Judith Nelson, soprano; 
Laurette Goldberg, harpsi- 
chord. This is a unique group 
which portrays historical eras 
through a multi-media approach; 
song, music, poetry, dance, 
drama, costume, prose, and hu- 
mor. They've won rave reviews 
in San Francisco— tune in and 
fine out what they do! Your 
host is Joseph Spencer. 

2:00 The Afternoon Air. Open time 
til 3:00 and news headlines 
with Marc Cooper; more open 
time til 4:00 and Nawana Da- 
vis with Music Black and White; 
at 5:00, The Wizards discuss 
"Navstar-Nonmilitary Appli- 
cations" with Len Jacobson. 
Terry Hodel with Calendar. 

6:00 The Evening News. 

6:45 Noticiero Pacifica. Treinta mi- 
nutos de los acontecemientos 
mas importantes de la semana. 

7:15 Voz y Raiz de Latino America. 

8:00 Prophets and Other Trouble- 
makers. Find out what the 
other half of the religious 
spectrum thinks about current 
events. Open phones for your 
input. 

9:00 Boston Symphony: Live in 
Concert. Mozart: £ine Kleine 
Nachtmusik;\J\oti\: Violin 
Concerto No. 22, Tchaikovsky: 
Serenade for Strings. Joseph 
Silverstein is the soloist. Chris- 
toph Eschenbach conducts. 
Stereo. Dolby Noise Reduction 
Program subject to char>ge. 
1 1 :00 Janus Company Radio Theater. 
The Wedding of Frankenstein. 
The conclusion of Jan and Mal- 
lory Geller's version of Mary 
Shellty's classic novel. 
1 1 :30 The Late Night News. 
12:00 am Something's Happening! 
Halloween montage. 



30 Friday 



6:00 Sunrise Concert. Carl Stone. 
9:00 This Morning. News, Blase 
Bonpane Commentary, Read 
All Aoout It, Calendar with 
Terry Hodel. 

10:00 Independent Music. With Mario 
Casetta. 

11:00 The Morning Reading. Tesf/- 
many: The Memoirs of Dmitri 
Shostakovich. Gary Kern reads. 

11:30 Public Affairs Open Time. 

12:00 Noon Concert: Soundboard. 
The last Friday of the month 
brings us once again to the 



OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 30 



Latin sound of Richard Stover 
and Latin Guitar day. Tune in 
for more of what we wait all 
month for! John Wager-Schnei- 
der hosts. 

2:00 The Afternoon Air. Portraits 
of the t/.S.S./?.-interviews, 
panel discussions, commentaries 
on Soviet history and society, 
from all points of view. At 
3:00, Newswatch with Marc 
Cooper and Clare Spark, open 
phones for your observations 
of news coverage by the news 
media; at 4:30, Just a Minute: 
The World This Wee/r-just like 
the title says. At 5:30, The 
Iron Triangle: Gordon Adams 
phones in with comment on the 
links between the military indus- 
try, Congress, and the Pentagon. 
Terry Model with Calendar. 

6:00 The Evening News. 

6:30 Open Journal. 

7:00 The Health Department. 
8:00 Le Jazz Hot & Cool. John 
Breckow hosts. 

10:00 Hour 25: Science Fiction. 
Mike Model, guests. 

12:00 am Straight, No Chaser. Jay 
Green hosts. 

2:00 am Listen to this Space. . . 



31 Saturday 



6:00 



7:30 

8:30 
10:30 



11:30 
12:25 
12:35 



2:00 

3:00 
4:00 
6:00 



Morning of the World. Recorded 

live In concert; Primer Festival 

de Musica Tradicional Latino- 

americana— Los Angeles. Second 

concert features Los Hermanos 

Aparicio (Venezuela), Skins 

(Cuba), Los Mermanos Gomez 

(Paraguay). Recorded April 11, 

1981 at East Los Angeles College, 

Ingalls Auditorium. 

Music of South Asia. Harihar 

Rao hosts. 

Folk Music. John Davis hosts. 

Halfway Down the Stairs. It's 

Hallowe'en: what will Uncle 

Ruthie have in store? Probably 

lots of tricks and treats. 

Public Affairs. 

Weekend Calendar. 

The Car Show. John Retsek 

and Len Frank, guests, good 

advice, open phones. 

Ballads, Banjos, & Bluegrass. 

Tom Sauber hosts. 

We Call It Music. Jim Seeley. 

Jazz Omnibus. Ron Pelletier. 

The Saturday News. 



6:30 Scoff of Reviewers. 

7:30 Opposition in Sister Squares. 

Hosted by Peter Goulds, this 
new program in KPFK's Cul- 
tural Affairs Department will 
take a close look at the state 
of the visual arts in Southern 
California, as well as on a na- 
tional and International level. 
Artists, curators, historians, 
and critics will be Interviewed 
to shed light on the relative 
health or malaise of the beast. 
8:00 William Malloch Programme. 

10:00 Imaginary Landscape. Tonight, 
host Carl Stone features the 
music of Wayne Slegel. 

12:00 am Maximum Rock & Roll. 
Tim Yohannan hosts, with 
guests. Small labels, imports 
featured. 
2:00 am 2 O'Clock Rock. The music 
of Eterr>al Scream, Die Form, 
45 Grave's "Riboflavin-flavored, 
Non-Carbonated Polyunsatura- 
ted Blood" and Naked Ray- 
gun's "When the Screaming 
Stops" as A. 'Enthal and Rob- 
ert Francis play underground 
rock for Halloween. 



AVANT GARDE? 
NEW THING?? 
FREE JAZZ??? 
NEW MUSIC???? 




Or music that won't stand still long enough to be categorized? 

We think that's a better definition. And that's why we stock such labels as: 

BEAD * BLACK SAINT * BVHAAST * DELMARK * FMP * ICP 
IMPROVISING ARTISTS * INCUS * INDIA NAVIGATION * NESSA 
OGUN * SACKVILLE * EL SATURN * ENJA * MOERS MUSIC 
SPOT LIGHT * STEEPLECHASE * TRIO * DENON * WHYNOT / 
BAYSTATE * SOULNOTE * MPS * AFFINITY * UNIQUE JAZZ 

AND MANY OTHER INDEPENDENT LABELS 



1101 E. WALNUT 

PASADENA 

449-3359 



nrrnnFP Fni in pahf 11 



Letters 



The performance of Vexations by 
Erik Satie was one of the larger and 
more fun undertakings of the Music 
Department. Carl Stone and Lois 
Vierk co-ordinated the schedule of 
the 18 pianists who played in half- 
hour shifts. They were: Gloria Cheng, 
Paul Reale, Bob Fernandez, Gaylord 
Mowry, Mike McCandless, Lorna 
Little, Zita Carno, Reymond Berney, 
Heidi Leseman, Del ores Stevens, Alan 
Oettinger, Felix De Cola, Richard 
Grayson, Milus Scruggs, Lucky 
Mosko, Ani Schwartz, David Ocker, 
and Leonid Hambro. Audrey Tawa 
stayed from 6 am to 1 am the next 
day with the task of keeping an ac- 
curate tally of the 840 repetitions 
demanded by the composer. Ahna 
Armour prepared a grande bouffe 
for all the participants, and Kathy 
Harada stayed to make sure things 
went smoothly. Special thanks to 
David Ocker for staying at the piano 
for an extra hour to finish up. By 
then end of the 19 hours, the sta- 
tion had received a total of 89 phone 
calls to comment on the broadcast: 
67 favorable and 22 not. Below is 
a sample of some of the telegrams 
and letters the station received in 
the days that followed. 



Dear Sirs, 

1 wasfascinated oy your courage 
and intellectual understanding of 
your broadcast on Sunday of the 
monunnental work of Erik Satie. 
I am a long-time student of the ar- 
tistic works of this giant. 

It occurs to me that many of your 
listeners are not aware of your cour- 
age and foresight in this effort. I 
have many interesting comments 
that could be applied to the music 
of Satie and to the problems that 
beset mankind at this most crucial 
era in our history. 

I consider Erik Satie one of the 
few giants who are able to look 
ahead and challenge our civilization 
to survive. 

Carlo Lodato 



Dear Carl Stone, 

I am a subscriber to KPFK and 
for four years I was a subscriber to 
WBAI in New York and I listen to 
about an average of 12 hours a day 
of KPFK. 

Last Sunday (September 6th) I 
tuned in at various times of the day, 
and did not hear the programs that 
I am normally used to listening to 
on a Sunday. Instead, what I heard 
was what sounded like to me as an 
endless, kindergarted level, finger 
exercise for the piano. 

Upon checking my Folio, I found 
that the entire day was devoted to 
the recitation of a singular work by 
some obscure composer named Erik 
Satie (i.e., the Vexations) . 

Now Carl, I can perfectly understand 
it if you and the other staff of KPFK 
were to devote an entire day of broad- 
casting of one symphonic composition 
or of even one piano concerto through- 
out the day, if that composition were 
to consist of multiple themes and/or 
movements with multiple variations, 
or if it were a composition of only 
one theme and/or movement with 
multiple variations, or if it were a 
composition of multiple themes and/ 
or movements with no variations, or 
any kind of composition that at least 
sounds different at least 1 minutes 
after it starts would all be much ap- 
preciated or at the very least, under- 
stood. 

However, when you take an entire 
day of precious and expensive broad- 
cast time and devote it to the execu- 
tion of a work with a singular theme, 
lasting a mere 80 seconds and then 
take that one theme and repeat it 
EIGHT HUNDRED AND FORTY 
times over the course of EIGHTEEN 

HOURS well then, this is just 

breaking every rule (written or other- 
wise) of sensibility, rationality, res- 
ponsibility and above all. . .sanity. 

With the full understanding that 
it is KPFK's policy to present and 
to showcase the literally hundreds 
of types of musics that would not 
be played elsewhere on any other 
radio station, and also with the recog- 
nition that it is KPFK's as well as 



your own personal interest to ex- 
plore the infinite possibilities of mu- 
sic, I do not seek to condemn you 
or the radio station for this act of 
utter nonsense. Nor should this let- 
ter be seen as a denunciation of mu- 
sic in the "Avant Garde," "Dadaist," 
or "New Music" genre. I myself have 
appreciated various presentations of 
unconventional music from such 
artists as Brian Eno, Robert Fripp, 
John Cage, John McLaughlin, and 
especially Frank Zappa. However, 
when you take a singular composition 
and repeat it 840 times, you are really 
violating the bounds of any type of 
decent broadcasting and if this is the 
way that the staff of the station takes 
a day off, then I think it would have 
been a better idea if you had simply 
signed off the transmitter. Also, I 
would suggest that you keep this type 
of music restricted to the bounds of 
its proper place: Imaginary Landscape. 

Finally, I would like to also use 
this letter to commend you on the 
excellent interview you did with 
Frank Zappa two months ago. Be- 
lieve me, I have heard and read lit- 
erally hundreds of interviews with 
that artist and I must jovially declare 
that yours was the best, most quali- 
tative, and the only really intelligent 
interview I have ever heard done with 
this great man. I am sure that Frank 
must have really enjoyed it too since 
this time, he was talking with a true 
musical expert and not just some 
"dime a dozen" fanzine muckraker. 
However, there was one very defini- 
tive point he made in that interview, 
and that was his condemnation of 
the vast majority of so-called "New 
Music" as nothing more than insin- 
cere "POOT" produced by talent- 
less music professors, struggling to 
hold on to their tenures at various 
universities. I just jumped for joy 
upon hearing this and I couldn't 
have agreed with him more. Un- 
fortunately, he forgot to mention 
how many thousands (or possibly 
millions) of tax dollars are wasted 
each year on the salaries to main- 
tain these worthless "Poot-Maes- 
tros" in their positions. 



nrrnRFR FOLIO PAGE 32 



As a closing comment to this letter, 
I would just like to pass on this firm 
suggestion concerning the Vexations, 
and the mindless debacle that was 
its performance. 

PLEASE, DON'T DO IT, OR 
ANYTHING LIKE IT AGAIN. 
Phil of Van Nuys 

P.S. No. 1 : Next time, try a Rach- 
maninoff festival. 

P.S. No. 2: I hope you don't have 
any plans for a performance of Philip 
Crevier's "Sadist Factory." 

P.S. No. 3: Please bring back "Un- 
provoked Attack." It was the great- 
est show ever. 



Dear Carl, 

Thank you and more for your in- 
credibly good work. The recent New 
Music America Festival broadcasts 
are just one among many programs 
that I'm very thankful for. I do not 
think that KPFK's programming 
should be determined by such un- 
democratic process as counting 
heads. Yet, if heads are going to be 
counted, I want my support to go 
squarely to all music programs, from 
Mario's to yours. A question however: 
are not the Boston symphony con- 
certs, at times, available on other sta- 
tions? If yes, is it a good use of 
KPFK's time to broadcast them? 
Suggestion: We now have unbroken 
news and P.A. every weekday 2-8 
pm. This is awfully hard to swallow, 
especially on coming home from 
work. An hour of music program- 
ming, say 5-6 before the news every- 
day would seem in order. 

My love and thanks to all pro- 
grammers and staff, 

Andre Orianne 

P.S. Yes, we're aware that come 
Sept., Tuesdays 4-5 is Tom Nixon— 
a good start. . . 



DearKPFK, 

I have admired KPFK's progressive 
programming, especially the "teach- 
in" series. However, I was disappointed 
with the station's treatment of the 
Northern Ireland segment. Billed as 
a "non-partisan" program, I was dis- 
mayed that there were no represen- 
tatives of the Unionist viewpoint or 
of those who do not support para- 
military or terrorist activities. It is 
difficult to believe that people with 
these opinions do not exist in South- 
ern California. I was shocked at sev- 
eral of the speakers' rudeness (in par- 
ticular, one "gentleman" who called 
the British information officer "a 
liar") when in fact several erroneous 
statements were made by these same 
speakers. 

I have, and will continue to support 
peaceful means to bring about a reso- 
lution to theproblems in Northern 
Ireland. 

Violence and terrorism, on any side, 
isnof the solution, but is actually the 
greatest enemy to the Irish people. 

Miriam Maertens Bennett 



Dear Al Huebner, 

It is easy to recognize that The 
Health Department is one of the 
most outstanding and enlightening 
of KPFK's fine selection of pro- 
grams. It presents information of the 
deepest significance to all of iis. 

Knowledge of [Biological Warfare] 
this monstrous conspiracy of evil 
must be spread far and wide in this 
country, and throughout the rest of 
the world. 

It may be that, through dedicated 
people like yourself, we shall realize 
the truth and use it in taking action 
to preserve ourselves and our fellow 
members of humanity. 

Phyllis Zakheim 



Dear Clare Spark, 

I applaud you for reading the article 
"Zionism from the Standpoint of its 
Victims." Though it has sent a shock- 
wave into our community, the article 
deserves to be acknowledged rather 
than dismissed by indiscriminate re- 
flexes of fear and anger. Its cogent ana- 
lysis suggests that Zionism be consid- 
ered as the Jewish version of a roman- 
tic consciousness that all European 
people apparently shared. This con- 
sciousness fostered the idea that Euro- 
pean civilization was God's gift to 
the world, an idea that obviously be- 
came corrupt when it failed to ad- 
mit that all civilizations are God's 
gift to the world. And so countless 
native people all over the world have 
been brutally dominated by Euro- 
pean supremacy— the brave new 
world wreaking havoc in its path. 
Under these circumstances I find it 
very ironical that the religions of 
Europe have their roots in struggles 
for liberation. The idea of karma is 
synoptically illustrated in the tide 
of meek who inherit the earth and 
promptly forget about the rest of 
the meek. I would let that game run 
down. 

Jeffrey Howard 



more 
letters 



OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 33 



Dear People, 

I just read Agnes de Bethune's res- 
ponse to Herbert Aptheker's speech, 
which I missed, calling for the ban- 
ning of Nazi and KKK propaganda. 
If what Mr. Aptheker said is what you 
say he said, Mr. Aptheker should heed 
the o!d proverb about people who 
live in glass houses. He would be si- 
lenced, too, in a few years. 

The Klans and the Brownshirts are 
uttlerly without redeaming social im- 
portance, in short— obscene, but the 
banning of noxious opinions from 
the air or from print is normally done 
by people with political power who 
want to keep it. The administration 
that banned them for their violent 
sentiments would have little trouble 
extending the ban to Marxist com- 
mentary (there's a lot of that on 
KPFK) for its "aid and comfort to 
international terrorism." I, for one, 
wouldn't mind silencing anyone who 
put in a good word for the PLO. If 
Mr. Aptheker wants a conservative 
Congress to start political censorship 
in this country, he has taken leave 
of his senses. 

James K. Mattis 



cd 

CD 
0) 



Dear Kids, 

Oscar Wilde believed that the only 
thing worse than being talked about 
was not being talked about. With that 
in mind, I'd like to congratulate you 
on finally being talked about in the 
Calendar section of tha Times. 

It's a pity, though, that the focus 
of the article wasn't so much on the 
recent changes in programming as it 
was on the way that the changes came 
about. I think that the responsibility 
(a nicer word than "blame") for that 
lies with Clare Spark. 

Clare Spark is a capable program 
director and I believe that she's mo- 
ving the station in the right direction, 
but she's also one of the most abra- 
sive personalities on the air (and ap- 
parently off) at KPFK. She has a 
unique ability to impress you and 
alienate you at the same time. A case 
in point would be the removal of 
Hepcats from Hell. I applaud the de- 
cision, but the implementation left 
me feeling sorry for Meltzer. 

I prefer to argue issues rather than 
personalities and I think that Clare 
Spark's doing a good job, but I also 
think that the time will come when 
she becomes more of a liability than 
an asset to the station. 
In peace, 

Alfred J. Lewis 



PRESCRIPTION FOR SURVIVAL 

continued Irom puQC 14. 

A series of symposia on The Medi- 
cal Consequences of Nuclear War 
has been conducted in cities around 
the country, and one is planned to 
take place in Los Angeles in October. 

The Los Angeles PSR chapter is 
seeking membership from interested 
area physicians. Those interested may 
write; Physicians for Social Respon- 
sibility, Los Angeles Chapter, P.O. 
Box 35385, Los Angeles, CA 90035. 
Or they may call (213)938-3837. 

References 

' The Effects of Nuclear War, Oii'ice 
of Technology Assessment, Congress 
of the United States, 1980. 

2 Ervin, F. et al: "Human and Ecolo- 
gic Effects in Massachusetts of an As- 
sumed Thermonuclear Attack on the 
United States." N. Engl. J. Med. 1962; 
266:1127-1137. 

3 Bulger, R.: " A Physician Consid- 
ers Nuclear War." J-4/W/\ 1981; 244: 
1255. 

•^ Lown, B. et al: "The Nuclear Arms 
Race and the Physician." N. Engl. J. 
Med. 1981: 304: 726-729. 



OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 34 



NOTE FROM BERLAND 

continued from page 3. 

As you may have already heard, 
the American Legal Foundation has 
filed against WPFW, Pacifica's Wash- 
ington station, in order to deny 
their license renewal. The leaders of 
this foundation have indicated that, 
if successful, they will consider filing 
against the other Pacifica stations. 
This challenge must be answered by 
Pacifica supporters. We urge you to 
join the battle to preserve the alter- 
native that Pacifica offers. If you 
would seek to join the battle by fil- 
ling some of the job openings avail- 
able, please write or call for more 
information and complete job des- 
criptions. 

At press time we have posted an- 
nouncements for Office Manager/ 
Volunteer Coordinator, Operations 
Director, and Development Director. 
The current salaries are $12,000/ 
year. The deadline for applications 
are October 15, 1981. We will be 
posting soon for Music Director and 
public affairs producers. We antici- 
pate a November 15 deadline for 
those jobs. 

In addition to the above-mentioned 
positions, KPFK will also be hiring 
some full-time programming staffers 
in news and public affairs and in mu- 
sic and the arts. 

Listen to KPFK for further no- 
tice. If you wish to be further in- 
formed, please write to Jim Berland 
at KPFK and indicate what type of 
job you might be interested in. We 
will send you descriptions when they 
are issued. Hiring will begin approx- 
imately November 1, 1981. 

It is with sadness that I have accep- 
ted Carl Stone's resignation. It is 
with pleasure 'h.^t I mark his con- 
tinued pr Tv' ce at KPFK as a pro- 
gram-ri-; and advisor. As we hav>. 
r.:ated recently, KPFK intends to 
keep ojr commitment to our mur.ic 
audience, as well an r o continue to 
• reach for new and needed, accom- 
plishments. 

in this iffort we will be aided by 
the foundation of accomplishments 
which Carl, Lois Vierk, and John 
Wager-Schneider have assembled. 
Their fine contributions to KPFK 



will continue with their programs, 
and we all wish them good fortune 
in the pursuit of their creative ca- 
reers. 

The increase in live music, the 
developm'i-'t of our international 
music, the expansion of our con- 
tact with local and international 
artists, and our presence on the van- 
guard of new music, all are advan- 
ces which we will not relinquish. 

I join with Carl in his determina- 
tion to promote the welfare of Pa- 
cifica radio in Southern California. 
There is no question that we are 
needed .-ow more than ever. 

For Pacifica, 

Jim Berland 
General Manager 



JOHN CAGE INTERVIEW 

continued from page 13. 

RR: This seems to have more to do 
with what we've discussed as theater. 
RA: It seems that the use of "theater" 
in this connection is a sort of transi- 
tional definition, to condition people 
to other possibilities. 
JC: And that the experience itself 
becomes markedly more subjective. 
RA: Markedly more subjective and 
particularly involved with a sort of 
indefinable sense of where your time 
information was coming from. 

JC: Exactly. 

RR: This would certainly take place 
if one could do away with the ob- 
vious hierarchy of importances which 
Is usually intended when you come 
to a musical experience. If the ex- 
perience is unpurposeful, and undi- 
rected, then response becomes totally 
a question of the listener's individual 
sensitivities and conditioning. 
JC: La Monte Young is doing some- 
thing quite different from what I am 
doing, and it strikes me as being very 
important. Through the few pieces 
of his I've heard, I've had, actually. 



utterly different experiences of lis- 
tening than I've had with any other 
music. He is able either through the 
repetition of a single sound or through 
the continued performance of a smgle 
sound for a period of twenty min- 
utes, to bring it about that after, say, 
five minutes, I discover that what I 
have all along been thinking was the 
same thing is not the same thing af- 
ter all, but full of variety. I find his 
work remarkable almost in the same 
sense that the change in experience 
of seeing is when you look through 
a microscope. You see that there is 
something other than what you 
thought there was. On the other hand. 
La Monte Young's music can be heard 
by Europeans as being European. For 
example, take the repetition of a tone 
cluster or a single sound at a seem- 
ingly constant amplitude over, say, 
a ten-minute period. The European 
listener is able to think, "Well, that 
is what we've always had, minus all 
the elements of variation." So they 
imagine, you see, that something is 
being done to them, namely a simpli- 
fication of what they're familiar with. 
My response is not that he is doing 
something to me, but that I am able 
to hear differently than I ever heard. 

RR: Do you think that America has 
yet begun to further its most striking 
and characteristic resource which you 
summarize as "its capacity to break 
easily with tradition, to move easily 
into the air, its capacity for the un- 
foreseen, its capacity for experimen- 
tation"? Are not some Europeans 
capitalizing on a limited exploration 
of what is a fundamentally American 
impulse? 

JC: There are two questions. We are 
clearly going to have a great deal of 
lively activity in America, and already 
are having it. And I also agree that 
Europeans will be capitalizing on it. 
What I hope is that the Europeans 
will become more American. 



OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 



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putic help, exploration and support. 
Maria JoyouspiritJimakas, Ph.D. 
Licensed MFCC: 559-1181. 



COSMIC COVER-UP? 

Learn of the revolution going on in 
physics and cosmology that the big 
institutions were unable to supress. 
Send 39.95 -h 6% for Calif. Res. to 
Craig Gunnufson (APGR Conf. Dir.), 
26176 Madison St., Murrieta, CA 
92362, in order to receive your copy 
of the proceedings held at Golden 
West College in March of '81. 



PIANO LESSON 

Instructor has M.A. in Music, 10 
years teaching experience. Beginner 
and advanced. Classical and Popular. 
397-6275. 



MENSA: Greater Los Angeles Branch 
International High IQ Society. 
P.O. Box 1941, Los Angeles, CA 
90053. 



SOCIALIST COMMUNITY SCHOOL. 

6 years of classes on Marxism, fernin- 
ism, art, peoples' history, and current 
events. Learn about socialism from 
socialists! Next session begins mid- 
October. Brochure NAM 2936 W. 8th 
St. LA 90005. Phone: 385-0650. 



ECOLOGISM POLITICAL PARTY. 

1330 S.E. Bristol No. 14, Santa 
Ana, CA 92707 Tel. (714) 540-7289. 
Anti-nuke music about Diablo; rock. 
Bill Newdome, performer. 



BIG BEAR LAKE-VACATION 
RENTAL. Lovely contemporary 
mountain home w. view. Fireplace. 
Deck. All conveniences. 3 BR/2 BA. 
Sleeps 8. Weekends/weekly. Call 
213/829-1115 for info. 



PACIFICA"s tape LIBRARY has a 

brand new catalogue of all new titles. 
For a FREE copy of over 300 Pacifica 
programs on cassette, write the 
Pacifica Tape Library, 5316 Venice 
Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90019. Phone 
213/931-1625. 



WANTED: Custodial supplies: amonia, 
sponges, cleanser, disinfectant, plastic 
trash bags (large), spray window clean 
ser, furniture polish, floor wax, clean 
rags, mop, broom(s), and other things 
we can't think of. Drop off at station 
during regular business hours. 



HEARFELT THANKS to the fol- 
lowing volunteers who have helped 
me over the last few months; Ruben 
Lopez, Theresa Mazurek, Dave Gard- 
ner, Jimmy Townes, Glen Hill. Spe- 
cial thanks to Mitchell Syrop, whose 
talents have improved the Folio im- 
measurably. Yours, Audrey. 



ADVERTISING RATES 
EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 1981. 



Full page: 7" wide 
9%" deep 



S300 



Half page 7' 

4'. 



wide 
i"deep 



SI 50 



Column 
inch rate 



2%"wide S 12 
(min. 3"deep) 



Full column (9% "deep $100 
half column I4%"deep $ 55 

Back Cover 7" wide S300 
7" deep 

Classified: S10 per column-inch, 
typesetting included. No art, just 
words. 40 characters per line, incl. 
spaces & punctuation. Or, 25 char- 
acters per line of ALL CAPS. Max. 
6 lines per inch. 

Payment in Advance! Please submit 
payment with your copy, as we have 
no money for billing or follow-up, 
and nobody to do it. 

Deadline: 1st of the month preced- 
ing the month of publication, (e.g., 
Feb. 1 for the March edition, etc.). 
One week before that if there is 
any work to do to get it ready! 

Camera Ready: The above prices 
are for camera ready art (except 
for the classified). Typesetting & 
art production services can be ne- 
gotiated at $10/hour (S10 min.), 
with an extra week required before 
deadline. S3 for all reductions, en- 
largements, half-tones, etc. That's 
below our cost. 

Audrey Tawa, Folio Editor 
3729 Cahuenga Blvd. West 
North Hollywood, CA 91604 
213/877-2711 




OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 37 



Your Subscription 



The Computer. 

Our computer is located in Santa Bar- 
bara. Your payment may not go into 
the computer as quickly as you might 
think because payments go to our 
lockbox and through the bank before 
they are fed into the computer. This 
process often takes more than a week 
from the time you send, your payment. 
So, if you send your check by the 1st 
of the month, you may receive the 
Folio for the following month. 

Bill Payment. 

Always send a bill with your check! 
We cannot credit your account cor- 
rectly unless we know exactly what 
your check is paying for. If you sond 
a check for a pledge payment with- 
out a bill, you might get credit for a 
new subscription and still be billed 
for your original pledge. 

First Class Folio Mailing. 
The Folio is mailed Second Class, and 
should take 2 to 5 days to get to most 
places. Unfortunately, our experience 
has not been good, especially with 
outlying areas. First Class mailing is 
available for 310 extra per year (pro- 
rated at 85c per month for current 
subscriptions. If you get your Folio 
on time but would like to receive it 
well before the first of the month, 
you may want to get the first class 
service. 

I Didn't Get My Folio. . . 
The Folio is mailed before the 24th of 
the month. If you have not received 
you Folio by the first of the month; 

1) check your subscription expiration 
date on the previous Folio mailing la- 
bel (upper right hand corner of label ). 

2) Make sure you haven't moved with- 
out notifying us. 3) If you haven't 
moved and are currently enrolled as 

a subscriber, contact your local post- 
master about delivery. 4) Send us a 
previous Folio label with an explana- 
tory note and request a new Folio 
be sent to you. 

Moving— Address Changes. 

If you move, your Folio will not be 
forwarded unless you have requested 
Second Class forwarding from the 
Post Office. The best way to expedite 
an address change and assure contin- 
ued receipt of the Folio is to contact 
us in writing 6 weeks before you 
OCTOBER FOLIO PAGt 38 



move, giving us your name, old zip- 
code, and new address. There is an ad- 
dress form on the back page of the 
Folio that you can clip: it already has 
your current mailing label on its back. 
Always include your account number 
at the top of your Folio label for in- 
stant handling. Address changes that 
we get back from the Post Office cost 
us 25c apiece. Changes can take 8 
weeks to affect your account. 


Exchange Mailing Lists. 
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scriber lists to other organizations of 
common interest (Channel 28, Ralph 
Nader, ACLU, etc.). If you don't want 
to be on exchange mailing lists, send 
your Folio label to the Subscriptions 
Department and ask for an "NJ" code. 
Your name will then be automatically 
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the Folio and other communications 


Prisoner Subscriptions. 

KPFK sends a free subscription to 
any prisoner upon request. 


from us. 


Cassette Folios for the Print 
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plete program guide on cassette. The 
cassettes are returned to us at the 
end of each month to be re-used. 


,fM 




MAIL COUPONS AND CHECKS T( 


) KPFK SUBSCRIBER SERVICES 


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[ ] New Subscription [ ] Renev 


/al 1 


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[ ] $15/ year low income. [ ] $ 8/!4year. 

( 1 $75/ year Film Club. [ 1 $40 down Film Club, 

then bill $5/mo., -^$5 service ($80 total) 


Gift Subscription 


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Check subscription rate above, and be sure to include BOTH 1 
the name and address of your gift recipient and your name, 1 
address, and current Folio label. | 


Film Club Conversion of Your Curre 


nt Subscription 


($15 credit given— new subscription 


for 12 months created.) 


[ 1 $60 Full payment. 




Nunt 




Mdreu 




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Volunteer Page 



Hi 



They turn the station on and off, and make it go in between. They run errands, produce 
programs, engineer, stuff envelopes, answer phones, build things, help at off-air events— 
in other words, we couldn't exist without them. Those not listed elsewhere in the Folio are: 



Frieda Afary / Kamran Afatv / Laurien 
Alexandre / Sheiron Allen / Marlene Al 
varado / Richard Amromin / Gayle An - 
derson / Art Aratin / Neal Baker / Rich - 
ard Ballou / Norma Barragan / Rudolfo 
Barragan / Greg Battes / Horace Beasley 
Be \erly BernakI / Bruce Bidlack / John 
Bliss / Michel Bogopolsky / Michael Bos 
George Braddock / Frankie Briscoe /Jo - 
sy Catoggio / Lucia Chappelle / Elisa 
Chavez / Louise Chevlin / BJ Clark / Pe - 
ter Cole / Terry Craig / Peter Cutler / Lo - 
ren De Phillips / Sandy Dickerson / Dino 
Di Muro / Gar Downing / Lisa Edmond • 
son / Michael Elliott / Ron Ehrenberg 
Richard Emmet / Andrew Exier / Debi 
F idler / Marianne Finkelstein / Frances 
Fischer / Stevi Powers / David Fradkin 
Scott Eraser / Kevin Gallagher / Dave 
Gardner / John Glass / Keith Gill / Gera 
Golden / Terry Goodman / Greg Gordon 
Jane Gordon / Gail Valerie Griffen / Rob ■ 
ert Griffin / Dan Halpert / Nancy Hamil - 
ton / Bill Handelsman / Burt Handelsman 
Rich Hansen / Jim Harris / Virginia Har - 
vey / Madeleine Herrold / Bernardo Her - 
nandez / Frank Hernandez / April Hill 
Skip Hockett / Sixto Huavpacho / Da- 
vid Hunt / Dennis Johnson / Michael 
Jondreau / Susan Judy / Ella Kaumeyer 
Hugh Kenny / Jens Klindt / Richard 
Kuchar / Chuck Larson / Melanie Lewis 
Roger LIghty / Ruben Lopez / Michael 
Lovalace / Elizabeth Luye / Iris Mann 



E VB Marcus / Ana Maya / Theresa Ma - 
zurek / Phil Medlin / Michael Miasnikov 
Joan Midler / Steve Mitchell / Sam Mit - 
telman / Thomas Moody / Ralph Neil 
Nanci Nishimura / Leslie Otsuki / Dow 
Parkes / Phoenix / Robert Portillo / 
Mike Powell / Anthony Price / Belle 
Rabinowitz / Jan Rabson / John Rf»t - 
liff / Don Roberts / Wendy Ross / Mary 
Rousson / Edith Royal / David Royer 
Leslie Sallee / Tom Scallon / Diane 
Schmidt / Maya Schoen / Celia 
Schwartz / Elliot Shifter / Rick Shea 
Robby Shear / Pearl E. Shelby / Bob 
Sheldon / Lester Silverman / Lorin 
Sklarmberg / Robert Smartt /Joan 
Sprague / Helen Steinmetz / Daryl 
Sterrett / Charles Stewart / Arthur 
Stidfole / Catherine Stifter / Timothy 
Stirton / Ron Streicher / Mitchell 
Syrop / Mark Tauger / Ed Thomas 
Janet Thomas / Susan Tewes / Mod - 
estine Thornton / Elissa Tree / Roy 
Ulrich / Howard Vaniicci / Patricia 
Vargas Cooper / Andy Vavrek / Bill 
Vestal / Barbara Warren / John Watson 
Debbie Weissman / Bert White / Linda 
Whitehead / Jane Willits / Kim Wilson 
Steve Wilson /Jim Witter. . . and all 
others we may have inadvertently 
omitted. 



Fund Drive Volunteers 

If you missed the volunteer meeting 
on September 29 and can volunteer 
your help for the Fall Fund Drive, 
please call Bob Aldrich or Ahna at 
the station during business hours at 
213/877-2711. We'll need to know 
what hours you'll be free to come in 
to answer phones or to help stuff en- 
velopes, or do other support work. 
Check dates listed in other parts of 
this Folic for actual fund-raising days. 
We'll need people after those pitching 
days to process the subscriptions. 
And we'll need people in November 
to do the whole process again. If 
you've got spare time and can give us 
a hand mornings, afternoons, evenings 
or nights, weekdays or weekends, give 
us a call. 

Can You Help Leaflet? 

In the past, we've had a rather hap- 
hazzard set-up for leafletting for KPFK 
events. If you're available to do leaf- 
letting, drop us a letter saying what 
you can do. Let us know if you have 
a car, what area(s) you can cover, how 
many leaflets you can distribute, and 
how we can contact you (home and 
work telephone numbers). We'll take 
care of the rest (probably by setting 
up the system through the Friends 
Chapters). This way we'll have a geo- 
graphic distribution system that we 
can use to drop leaflets off at a central 
place and have them go out from there. 



moving? 



Your Folio will NOT be forwarded 
automatically to your new address. 
It will be returned to us after a few 
weeks with your new address on it— 
probably not in time for the next 
Folio! So to avoid missing out, fill 
out this coupon and return it to us, 
with your current (old address) label 
still attached on the reverse side. 



PLEASE PRINT! 



Name 



New Address 

City 

State 



Zip. 



Mail to: Subscriptions, KPFK, 3729 Cahuenga Blvd. West, No. Hollywood, CA 91604. 



OCTOBER FOLIO PAGE 39 




KPFK Folio 

(ISSN-0274-4856) 

P.O. Box 8639 

Universal City CA 91608. 

Studios at 3729 Ca'iuenga Blvd. West 

North Hollywood CA 91604. 



TIME VALUE: 
Program material 
October 1 through 31. 



Pacifica Radio«Los Angeles